An ATA Professional Development Event
Presented by the American Translators Association
and the Houston Interpreters and Translators Association
   
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REGISTER TODAY
Take advantage of special Early-Bird rates available until February 15.
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BOOK YOUR HOTEL
Take advantage of special rates, available until February 1.
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CONTINUING EDUCATION
Earn up to 8 CEPs for the ATA Certification Program.
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CERTIFICATION EXAM
An ATA certification exam sitting will be held on Sunday, February 24.
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ATTENTION EXHIBITORS AND SPONSORS
Interested in becoming an Exhibitor? CLICK HERE

Interested in becoming a Sponsor? CLICK HERE

 

PLEASE NOTE: This program is subject to change.

 

Abstracts & Bios
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Demystifying Cardiovascular Terminology

Medical translators frequently encounter terminology related to cardiovascular tests and procedures in their work. Just what is an occlusion of the LAD, or an ST segment depression, or decreased ventricular wall motion? A general understanding of cardiovascular procedures facilitates an accurate translation. This workshop will provide information on common cardiovascular tests and procedures from a layman's perspective. Resources, such as a glossary and websites for further study, will be provided.

Mary Esther Diaz, M.Ed., is a self-employed translator, interpreter, and trainer. She currently serves as the president of the Austin Area Translators and Interpreters Association (AATIA), as an executive committee member of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care, and as a member of ATA's Public Relations Committee. She learned Spanish while living and studying in Mexico for 10 years. She is ATA-certified from Spanish to English and from English to Spanish. She worked as an in-house medical translator, disability examiner, and training director for the Texas Rehabilitation Commission where she also taught medical terminology for 19 years. She has more than 25 years of experience as a translator and trainer. A co-founder of the AATIA, she also created the seven-course Translation and Interpretation Certificate Program at Austin Community College. In addition to teaching Bridging the Gap for the Cross Cultural Health Care Program, she has taught interpreter workshops for the Florida Department of Health and is an adjunct faculty member of Austin Community College and San Antonio Northwest Vista College. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and Master of Education in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Leadership from the University of Texas at Austin.

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How to Translate for the Healthcare Consumer:
A Hands-on Workshop


This workshop will address issues of importance in translating for the largest segment of the U.S. medical translation market: the consumer of healthcare information. It will consist of discussions and practical exercises to familiarize translators with the unique challenges presented by medical documents written for the patient. Some of the topics to be covered include: using the appropriate register; protecting patients' rights; following government regulations; and making sure that a translation reflects the purpose of the document. A major focus will be the criteria used by major hospitals and medical research institutions in reviewing translations intended for their patient populations.

Maria A. Cornelio is coordinator of the Spanish/English major concentration for the BA in Translation and Interpretation at Hunter College of the City University of New York. For nearly a decade, she was the Spanish-language consultant to the Institutional Review Board of the New York State Psychiatric Institute and director of the Hispanic Resource Center at Columbia University Medical Center. In that capacity, she directed recruitment and language-support programs for Spanish-speaking patients in clinical trials and carried out language-competency assessments of bilingual healthcare professionals. She is a founding member of Kaiser Permanente’s National Coalition for Quality Translations in Health Care. She is a nationally known speaker, writer, and consultant in the fields of medical translation and patient education. She has designed medical translation courses and taught in the translation certificate programs at New York University and the University of Chicago. She has held various positions with non-governmental organizations, carrying out public health and health education programs in North Africa and Latin America. Her working languages are English, Spanish, and French, and she holds a master's degree in International Studies from the University of Denver. She studied at the University of Seville, Spain, holds a Diplome d'Études Françaises from the University of Poitiers, France, and has a bachelor's degree in Spanish and French from Hunter College of the City University of New York. She is also certified in Good Clinical Practices through Columbia University.

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Boundaries and Self Care in Helping Professions

The subject of healthy and appropriate boundaries has been the subject of debate for some time. The difficulty with establishing appropriate boundaries is that they change according to settings, circumstances, and the people involved. This presentation will define and discuss these issues. The importance of clear lines between what is acceptable and what is not is especially needed in the professional arena where intense emotions are present. This could not be more true than in a cancer setting or any area where sickness, bad news, potential mortality, and body image changes are constant. Getting too involved or too helpful can be harmful to both patient and provider. A calm, confident demeanor is a strong stabilizing factor in emotionally unstable situations. Clear personal values are essential. There may be times when differences of opinion definitely test your sense of ethical rightness or wrongness. If you find yourself constantly "giving in" or compromising your values, the discomfort may lead to premature burnout and loss of professional resiliency. Self care and having a support network both inside and outside of work provides safety and validation. This is part of taking care of yourself so that you can continue to do what you feel called to do. And don’t forget humor; used appropriately, it can be both healing and helpful.

Kathie Rickman, DrPH, RN, CNS, LCDC, has worked at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) as a psychiatric clinical nurse specialist and addiction counselor for the past six years. Prior to coming to MDACC, she was the director of a 100-bed detoxification and residential substance abuse treatment center. She was on the faculty at the University of Texas School of Nursing in Houston and now serves on the Advisory Committee for the Texas Peer Assistance Program for Nurses. Additionally, she serves on the Board of Directors for COOL Ministries, Inc., a faith-based substance abuse treatment center in Houston.

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Texas Legislation to Achieve Standard Qualifications for the Healthcare Interpreter

The Texas Association of Healthcare Interpreters and Translators (TAHIT) was formed to address the inconsistency in qualifications for professional interpreters in the state of Texas. TAHIT is working to achieve standard qualifications for the healthcare interpreter to ensure accurate transmission of vital medical information and the provision of excellent healthcare to all, regardless of their ability to speak English. This session will discuss possible state legislation related to healthcare interpreters.

Mary Esther Diaz, M.Ed., is a self-employed translator, interpreter, and trainer. She currently serves as the president of the Austin Area Translators and Interpreters Association (AATIA), as an executive committee member of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care, and as a member of ATA's Public Relations Committee. She learned Spanish while living and studying in Mexico for 10 years. She is ATA-certified from Spanish to English and from English to Spanish. She worked as an in-house medical translator, disability examiner, and training director for the Texas Rehabilitation Commission where she also taught medical terminology for 19 years. She has more than 25 years of experience as a translator and trainer. A co-founder of the AATIA, she also created the seven-course Translation and Interpretation Certificate Program at Austin Community College. In addition to teaching Bridging the Gap for the Cross Cultural Health Care Program, she has taught interpreter workshops for the Florida Department of Health and is an adjunct faculty member of Austin Community College and San Antonio Northwest Vista College. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and Master of Education in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Leadership from the University of Texas at Austin.

Jorge U. Ungo is the event coordinator for the Texas Association of Healthcare Interpreters and Translators (TAHIT). In addition to his work with TAHIT, he serves as the director of Professional Development for HITA, as well as the co-chair of membership for the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care. He is a native of San Salvador, El Salvador and is fluent in English and Spanish.

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Anatomy of a Pediatric Heart Surgery:
What Is so Special about the Heart of a Child?


This workshop will cover the many aspects of interpreting for the child, family, and medical professional needing to convey information in a surgical situation and, more specifically, through the many services involved in caring for a child undergoing heart surgery. In this stressful situation, the right words are most important; difficulty or lack of understanding can lead to mistrust and anger toward healthcare providers. This workshop will share the challenges of conveying the medical and surgical aspects of family education to parents who cannot see the complex and life-threatening defects in their child's heart. Information will be provided on the processes and procedures used in a major pediatric hospital that has developed an excellent support system for its population of non-English-speaking families.

Graciela Zozaya, born and raised in Mexico City, holds an associate's degree in Education and has over 30 years of experience in interpreting and translation. For the past seven years, she has been working at the Texas Children's Hospital Heart Center in Houston and holds a dual position as interpreter and patient advocate, serving as a bridge to aid in the communication and resolution of issues that may arise during a patient's admission. She serves as co-chair of the annual Heart Center Parent Conference, that seeks to provide information and support to parents of children with congenital heart disease, and has participated as co-trainer in the Spanish Bilingual Assistant program at Texas Children's Hospital. She is a member of ATA, HITA, the National Council for Interpreters in Health Care, and the Texas Alliance for Patient Services.

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Heart Disease: Innovations in Management and Treatment

Abstract coming soon...

Dr. Rajiv Agarwal graduated from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. He then completed a residency in Internal Medicine and served as chief medical resident at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. He continued his education there in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and also served as chief cardiology fellow. He was awarded the prestigious "Clinical Fellow of the Year Award" each year the award was presented during his fellowship. Additionally, he was awarded the National Young Investigators Award for his research presentation titled Frequency of Significant Incidental Findings in Routine Renal MRI/MRA Examinations Performed for Suspected Renovascular Hypertension. A member of numerous pre-eminent local, national, and international cardiology and radiology organizations, he is board certified in internal medicine and cardiovascular medicine. He has published several articles and presented numerous abstracts at national and international conferences.


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