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Making Headlines in Government


The growing demand for translation and interpreting services has recently brought new attention to the professions in both the U.S. Senate and the Supreme Court.

U.S. Supreme Court Decision in Taniguchi v. Kan Pacific Saipan

On May 21, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in the case of Taniguchi v. Kan Pacific Saipan, Ltd. By a vote of six to three, the Court ruled that the “compensation of interpreters” awarded to the prevailing party under the Court Interpreters Act of 1978 does not include the cost of document translation.

The majority opinion, written by Justice Samuel Alito, held that the ordinary meaning of the word “interpreter” is a person who translates spoken as opposed to written language. Because no definition is provided in the Court Interpreters Act, the justices found no compelling argument that Congress must have intended to dispense with the ordinary meaning of interpreter in calling for the compensation.

Justice Ginsburg, joined by Justices Breyer and Sotomayor, filed a dissenting opinion, arguing that the purpose of the Court Interpreters Act was to ensure that litigants who don’t speak or read English could take part in their cases. Translation prepared for use in court is as critical to equity in such cases as interpreting is in the court proceedings themselves. The dissenting justices noted that the current ruling was inconsistent with the spirit of the 1978 Act.

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A National Security Crisis: Foreign Language Capabilities in the Federal Government

A Senate panel was convened on May 21 to examine the ongoing language deficit in the federal government. Representatives from the Departments of Defense, Education, and State, as well as members of the intelligence community, testified before the subcommittee that although there has been an aggressive and sustained effort to increase foreign language capabilities, language needs in all three departments continue to outpace the number of qualified linguists.

Explaining the challenges of recruitment at her agency, FBI Deputy Assistant Director Tracey North said, "There is a limited availability of qualified speakers of vital foreign languages who are U.S. citizens and have the English skills to support our requirements.”

In his statement to the panel, ATA Honorary Member and Gode Medal Recipient Glenn Nordin stated, "For the long-term, we have to dedicate the time and effort needed to educate; transforming how our schools and universities regard and teach foreign language and culture. Today’s academia simply will not produce, for the foreseeable future, the number of linguists the federal, state, and local governments need."

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Industry News
Lack of Interpreters Keeps Inmates in Jail Longer
Supreme Court Rules Interpreting and Translating Are Different
U.S. Government Has Foreign Language Deficit
Poor Language Skills Constrain Corporate International Growth
Secrets of SEO Success in Other Languages
Disney Website Will Automatically Translate Online Chats
Growing Language Needs Are a Challenge for Nevada Justice System
Spain Developing Web Legal System for Immigrants
U.S. Developing Metaphor-Recognizing Software in Five Languages
Duolingo Translates the Internet for Free
Translation Demand-Supply Mismatch
Thinking in a Foreign Language Helps Economic Decision-Making
Translators Get a Slam of Their Own at PEN Festival

ATA News
Summer Blockbuster Webinars
Exhibit Hall Space Selling Out!
ATA 2012 Elections: Candidates Announced
Pricing Strategies: Q&A
ATA and AFTI Scholarships
Coming Up in the June Issue of The ATA Chronicle

Industry News


Lack of Interpreters Keeps Inmates in Jail Longer

Kelli Childress, a public defender for Kane County, Illinois, told a Kane County Board committee that minority defendants with limited English-language skills spend more time in jail due to a shortage of Spanish-speaking employees. "I think this is a problem," Childress says, noting that it has become a budget issue for the Illinois county. She says scheduling conflicts between the court-appointed interpreters, the two Spanish-speaking lawyers in the public defender's office, and the courts have resulted in logjams in the judicial system. Childress says hiring more bilingual support staff rather than keeping inmates in jail may result in significant savings. Unfortunately, few Spanish-speaking attorneys have applied for positions, and Childress notes that bilingual employees currently do not receive additional pay. Committee member Jim Mitchell suggests offering Spanish classes to existing employees in the public defender’s office, but court administrator Doug Naughton says that probably would not help. "The street slang used by many of the gang members is very difficult to understand," he says.

From "Kane Official: Lack of Translators is Keeping Inmates in Jail Longer"
Chicago Sun-Times (IL) (05/18/12) Brennan, Matt
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Supreme Court Rules Interpreting and Translating Are Different

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that court document translation is not the same as interpreting services in a federal lawsuit. The Court's ruling reverses a decision made by an appeals court in the case of former professional baseball player Kouichi Taniguchi. Taniguchi's original suit was brought against a hotel for injuries suffered on its property. The hotel won the case, and used a 1978 federal law to recoup interpreting costs related to the case, including $5,000 for translation of court documents. In announcing the ruling, Justice Samuel Alito said the majority of the court relied on a 1978 Oxford English Dictionary to conclude that the meaning of "interpreter" is limited to someone who translates orally from one language to another. In similar cases, most appellate courts have determined that "interpreter" includes translation of written material. The dissenters on the Court were Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, and Sonia Sotomayor. Those dissenting said that it is difficult to make the distinction between translation and interpreting in court cases, as many documents may be read aloud by a linguist, and existing practice in most federal courts allows for reimbursing the costs of translation.

From "Friendly Ump: Japanese Ballplayer Wins at Supreme Courtpitals Struggle to Provide Interpreters for Patients Who Don’t Speak English"
Wall Street Journal (NY) (05/21/12) Landers, Peter
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U.S. Government Has Foreign Language Deficit

The U.S. government's lack of foreign language proficiency was addressed at a May 21 hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs subcommittee on government management and the federal workforce. Subcommittee Chairman Sen. Daniel K. Akaka (D-Hawaii) cited national security agencies' ongoing "shortages of people skilled in hard-to-learn languages due to a limited pool of Americans to recruit from." The State Department's Linda Thomas-Greenfield reported that only 61 percent of the Department's language-designated positions were filled with fully qualified staff in 2009, and while there have been significant improvements since then, more than 25 percent of the positions are still not adequately filled. There is a particularly great need for people competent in Near East, South Asian, and East Asian languages. "Over the past several years, we have had to make critical choices about whether to leave a position vacant for the time it takes to train a fully language-qualified officer or curtail all or part of the language training," Thomas-Greenfield noted. "These were difficult choices." Meanwhile, FBI Deputy Assistant Director Tracey North told the panel that on average only one out of every 10 contract linguists gets through the Bureau's rigorous applicant process. "Furthermore, there is a limited availability of qualified speakers of vital foreign languages who are U.S. citizens and have the English skills to support our requirements," North said. The Defense Department's Laura Junor noted that although more than 80 percent of the department's language slots were filled in fiscal year 2011, just 28 percent "were filled with personnel at the required foreign-language proficiency level."

From "Government Has Foreign Language Deficit"
Washington Post (DC) (05/21/12) Davidson, Joe
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Poor Language Skills Constrain Corporate International Growth

According to a survey conducted by a business research group, companies often find their plans for international expansion limited by their employees' lack of communication and language skills. The Economist Intelligence Unit surveyed 572 senior executives from private and public sector organizations worldwide. Forty-nine percent of respondents acknowledged that communication misunderstandings and messages lost in translation have hindered major international business deals and resulted in substantial company losses. Sixty-four percent believe linguistic and cultural differences have complicated their acquisition of foreign market share. A majority of the executives surveyed think improving cross-border communications at their organization would lead to significant boosts in profits, revenue, and market share. Almost half of the respondents said their companies do not offer sufficient training to polish employees' language and communication proficiencies, and 40 percent of the executives doubted that their firms place enough stress on hiring or selecting people who are suited for cross-cultural environments. The study emphasized English's crucial role in international business growth, with most survey respondents pointing to the need for English fluency among employees in order to compete on a global level. Sixty-eight percent of executives believe employees will need to know English so that their organization can expand outside their home markets. "Newer economies will fail on their internationalization plans, and older economies, which are already struggling, will find it almost impossible to regain their competitive foothold if businesses do not devote the appropriate time and resources into improving the international language skills of their key staff," notes EF Corporate Language Learning Solutions President Christoph Wilfert. "It has never been as critical as it is today."

From "Poor Communication and Language Skills of Employees Are Constraining International Growth Prospects of Companies"
PR Web (VA) (04/25/12)
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Secrets of SEO Success in Other Languages

Search engine optimization for a multilingual audience can become a major advantage by providing access to expanding, relatively untouched foreign markets, writes Christian Arno, founder of Lingo24. The first step in identifying potential markets and revealing degrees of competition should be keyword research, which organizations on a tight budget can do it themselves with the aid of native-speaking translators or copywriters. Arno warns that a common mistake is assuming that direct translations of keywords will be just as effective in other dialects. For example, while the standard French translation of "car insurance" is l’assurance automobile, the most popular search term is "auto assurance." "Start by translating your keywords and brainstorming similar terms," he advises. "Then check with a native speaker for suggestions." Organizations should also ask themselves whether the keywords are pertinent to site content and are likely to spur sales. Arno says free tools such as Wordtracker and Google Adwords can enable organizations to set a specific language and location and check the popularity and degree of competition for keywords. According to Arno, search engines that establish separate, optimized sites for each target country rather than each language will generate better results. "Google and other search engines penalize duplication, but they don't recognize it in translation," he notes. "This means your French and German sites can be direct translations of your English site, but you should change it for your French-Canadian site." Arno also points out that search engine sites can be given more authenticity through the inclusion of local cultural and geographic references.

From "Secrets of SEO Success in Other Languages"
SEOmoz (WA) (04/26/12) Arno, Christian
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Disney Website Will Automatically Translate Online Chats

Disney's Club Penguin website soon will be able to translate online chats between English-speaking children and children who speak Spanish, French, Portuguese, and German. Currently, the chat system can translate 300,000 pre-selected phrases automatically, but later this year the development team expects to have more than six billion phrases that can be used between the site's supported languages. Lane Merrifield, Club Penguin's co-founder, says the team wondered about what it would "be like to create a world where language barriers disappear." Several computational linguists and translators are working to develop the new translation system, which is designed to remove language barriers for children using the site. One of the ways that Disney keeps the site safe for children is to pre-select the phrases they are allowed to use in conversation. That prevents children using inappropriate language or revealing personal information. As a result, the service has a database of phrases which can be matched to their equivalents in other languages. Mark Shuttleworth, head of the translation group at Imperial College, London, says Club Penguin has developed an interesting approach to dealing with translating conversations, although finding equivalent matches for phrases in several languages has been a difficult technical challenge. He says although the service may work for social networks used by children, it may not be sophisticated enough for social networks used by adults.

From "Club Penguin's Translation System Will Make Language Barriers Vanish"
London Telegraph (United Kingdom) (05/01/12) Richmond, Shane
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Growing Language Needs Are a Challenge for Nevada Justice System

The Nevada justice system is struggling to keep up with the needs of its non-English-speaking residents, and Clark County is a prime example of the problem. The most commonly spoken foreign language in the county is Spanish, yet there is only one Spanish language interpreter in the public defender's office. Last year, the office handled 4,000 to 5,000 cases involving Spanish-speaking defendants. A limited budget has prevented the hiring of more staff interpreters, so the county relies on certified court interpreters to fill in when the staff interpreter is not available. To further cover the interpreter shortage, the county contracted locally with 20 highly skilled and trained Spanish interpreters. But when the county recently cut their hourly pay by 28 percent, some of the interpreters refused to sign new contracts and others left to work in private-sector jobs that pay three times as much. "When I work, I need to be paid the rate that this is worth," says Judy Jenner, a certified Spanish court interpreter and president of the Nevada Interpreters and Translators Association. "I think the rate that Clark County is willing to pay now stands in no relation to the expertise that you need to do this job." Jenner says that without qualified court interpreters, attorneys cannot communicate effectively with their clients and the possibility of critical errors increases. "The reality of America in 2012 is we have these people who don’t speak the language," Jenner says. "How are you going to give them access? Interpreting is the only way until someone invents a robot where you push a button and out comes the interpreting."

From "Growing Language Needs a Challenge for Nevada Justice System"
Fronteras Desk (AZ) (05/03/12) Joffe-Block, Jude
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Spain Developing Web Legal System for Immigrants

The Textual Genres for Translation Research Group at the Universitat Jaume I in Spain has developed a Web platform designed to improve the work processes for translation and interpreting professionals, allowing immigrants to understand and to make themselves understood before a court of law. The platform offers documentary, textual, and terminological resources that make use of information technology. Researchers say it includes everything from multilingual glossaries to schemas of legal systems from different countries, such as lists of documents subject to translation in legal institutions. Researchers developed the platform using information they collected on the professional needs of legal translators within the Legal Tribunal of the Valencian Community. It was determined that a suitable infrastructure for carrying out specialized translation tasks was lacking. For instance, a preliminary study found that applied translation tools were not being used, but that text translation was being done by hand and then sent to other legal institutions by fax. It is hoped that the new platform will help modernize administrative processes and improve the professional image of linguists and translators, as well as ease communication between professional legal translators and immigrants. The project is subsidized by Spain's Ministry for Science and Innovation.

From "The UJI Is Developing a Web Platform to Facilitate Communication to Immigrants in a Court of Law"
Jaume I University (Spain) (05/18/12)
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U.S. Developing Metaphor-Recognizing Software in Five Languages

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory has awarded a $1.4-million contract to a team that plans to develop software that can analyze metaphorical speech in five languages automatically. The Autonomous Dynamic Analysis of Metaphor and Analogy (ADAMA) project will build systems to identify, access, and analyze large quantities of online data. The plan is to develop a repository of speech metaphors from American English, Iranian Farsi, Mexican Spanish, and Russian speakers. With research funded by the U.S. Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, one of the key goals of the program is to gain a deeper sense of metaphoric and figurative language in order to better understand the messages and intentions of people from communities worldwide. "On a very basic level, we want to understand the various ways words or phrases are interpreted in different languages," says Shlomo Argamon, an associate professor of computer science at the Illinois Institute of Technology who is heading up the research team. "We will develop technology that can identify such metaphorical speech to get a much better understanding of the way people think about things." Researchers say ADAMA could have immediate applications in forensics, intelligence analysis, business intelligence, sociological research, and communication studies.

From "US Sets $1.4M to Get Unique Metaphor-Recognizing Software System Humming"
Network World (MA) (05/09/12) Cooney, Michael
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Duolingo Translates the Internet for Free

Translating the Internet into every language is a massive undertaking, and one that machine translation is not up to handling. Carnegie Mellon University Professor Luis von Ahn is tackling the problem with Duolingo, a free language-learning service that doubles as a crowdsourced text translation platform. Users follow a step-by-step process to learn a language as they translate websites and other types of information available on the Internet. The platform will become open to the public on June 19 after private beta testing. The service began with lessons for English speakers to learn German and Spanish, and Spanish speakers to learn English. Von Ahn says his goal with Duolingo is to get 100 million people to translate the Internet into every tongue. He says the platform surmounts two obstacles: the lack of bilingual speakers and the lack of motivation to get people to contribute to the translation effort. "Learning a language for free while simultaneously translating the Web is as accurate as professional translators," von Ahn claims. Duolingo can boost accuracy by comparing translations from multiple people taking the same lesson. The platform also will boast interactivity by furnishing activity streams, enabling users to contact each other and write on their stream.

From "Duolingo Translates the Internet for Free"
CNet (CA) (05/22/12) Farber, Dan
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Translation Demand-Supply Mismatch

The rapidly growing demand for translation, a continuing lack of qualified linguists, and stagnant translator productivity will create a shortage of high-quality human translation in the near future, according to Common Sense Advisory. The international marketing research firm says that the need for content translation is being fueled by large information and data management companies as well as by smaller businesses in new markets. Meanwhile, executives at language service providers say that they are confronted with a chronic shortfall of qualified translators. At the same time, industry experts say translator productivity has stalled at 2,000 to 3,000 words daily. (A recent poll conducted by Common Sense Advisory found that individual translators report averaging 2,684 words a day.) With demand outstripping supply, translation prices should climb, but Donald DePalma, Common Sense Advisory's chief strategy officer, says that in view of the language sector's price sensitivity and the constrained budgets of many international companies, widespread rate hikes are not projected for the immediate future. Instead, DePalma foresees a decline in translation quality as a result of increased production of unrefined machine translation and more providers entering the market with less qualified translators. "In any of these scenarios, we expect that many buyers and suppliers will merely react to the changes rather than permanently change their behaviors," DePalma says. "If they can step back from their day-to-day issues, though, they will see that the market for language services has fundamentally changed. Once a cottage industry, language has become a core business process and critical enabler for a range of economic, political, and humanitarian activities—and subject to all the attendant macroeconomic pressures." DePalma predicts that some in the market will be unnerved by so many changes in such as a short time, leading to what sociologists have labeled "future shock." "To survive," he says, "they will have to adapt to the new realities and economics of language services."

From "Translation Demand-Supply Mismatch"
Common Sense Advisory (MA) (05/17/12) DePalma, Donald A.
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Thinking in a Foreign Language Helps Economic Decision-Making

University of Chicago researchers have found that thinking through problems in a foreign language can lead to more rational business decisions. "We know from previous research that because people are naturally loss-averse, they often forgo attractive opportunities," says Chicago Professor Boaz Keysar. "Our new findings demonstrate that such aversion to losses is much reduced when people make decisions in their non-native language." To determine the influence a foreign language has on decisions involving risk, the university researchers looked at the probability of an individual accepting an attractive bet depending on the language in which they weighed their options. The study participants were native English-speaking students with proficiency in the Spanish language. When tested in English, the students focused on the worry of losing each bet, and only took the bet 54 percent of the time. But when tested in Spanish, the subjects took the bet 71 percent of the time. "Perhaps the most important mechanism for the effect is that a foreign language has less emotional resonance than a native tongue," says Chicago graduate student Sayuri Hayakawa. "An emotional reaction could lead to decisions that are motivated more by fear than by hope, even when the odds are highly favorable." Keysar adds that a foreign language allows people to distance themselves from a problem psychologically, helping them move from an immediate intuitive system to a more deliberate mode of thinking. The researchers also explored a foreign language's impact on asymmetry in decision-making—when the same choice is framed as either a gain or a loss. They found that when the students made decisions in a foreign language, they assessed their choices based on expected results rather than by the presentation of "good" or "bad." The researchers concluded, "People who routinely make decisions in a foreign language might be less biased in their savings, investment, and retirement decisions, as they show less myopic loss aversion."

From "Thinking in a Foreign Language Helps Economic Decision-Making"
UChicago News (IL) (04/25/12)
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Translators Get a Slam of Their Own at PEN Festival

Writers from around the world gathered in New York City earlier this month for the PEN World Voices Literary Festival of International Literature, celebrating "the power of the written word in action." Marking PEN American Center’s 90th anniversary, this year’s festival featured performances, discussions, one-on-one conversations, and readings. Of the four translation events on the program, the Translation Slam proved to be the most popular. The event, sponsored in part by the Mexican Cultural Institute, was divided into two segments. In the first, Mariela Dreyfus, a Peruvian translator and poet who teaches at New York University, and Román Antopolsky, an Argentine-born translator, read their versions of a poem called "White Noise," written by Laurie Sheck, who was sitting on stage with them, and then took questions from the audience. In the second half of the program, two Spanish-to-English translators read their translations of a short piece of prose written by Naief Yehya, a writer born in Mexico City who now lives in New York. Translation "is a solitary art, but because of that it is refreshing for translators to come out of the shadows and talk about what they do, to talk out loud about decisions you make in your mind every day," says PEN Translation Fund Chairman Michael F. Moore. Spanish was selected as the featured language of this year's Translation Slam because it is the native language of more than 20 nations and boasts an unusual richness and diversity of accents, colloquialisms, and idioms. "Translation is a delicate balancing act," Moore says. "Every paragraph, every sentence, every word raises questions and involves choices … We want this to be a learning experience." This is the fifth year that the festival has organized a Translation Slam, and the languages chosen in the past have included German, Hebrew, French, Catalan, and Urdu.

From "Translators Get a Slam of Their Own at PEN Festival"
New York Times (NY) (05/04/12) Rohter, Larry
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ATA News


Summer Blockbuster Webinars

»  Machine Translation for Translators
Presenter: Rubén de la Fuente
Date: June 20
Time: 12 Noon U.S. Eastern Time
Duration: 60 minutes
CE Point(s): 1

Translators frequently overlook the potential for machine translation to increase their productivity while maintaining quality. Attend this 60-minute webinar with Ruben de la Fuente to learn how to take advantage of machine translation by making it part of your current workflow. Register now to guarantee your virtual seat.

»  What's in Your Kit? The Medical Translator's Guide to Navigating Clinical Trials
Presenter: Erin M. Lyons
Date: July 19
Time: 12 Noon U.S. Eastern Time
Duration: 60 minutes
CE Point(s): 1

It's easy to lose sight of the big picture. Understanding translation as part of the clinical trial process is crucial for translators working in this field. Change your perspective—join presenter Erin Lyons in examining the steps involved in investigational research and the role played by translation and medical documentation. ATA webinars are limited to 100 attendees. Register now to avoid missing this event.

»  Documenting Terms, Once and For All
Presenter: Barbara Inge Karsch
Date: August 14
Time: 12 Noon U.S. Eastern Time
Duration: 60 minutes
CE Point(s): 1

If you've done the work once, do you really want to do it all over again? Presenter Barbara Karsch will show you how to document terms and parts of speech so that you can retrieve the information over and over again, no matter what terminology tool you use. Previous ATA webinars have sold out in advance. Register now while space is still available.

Exhibit Hall Space Selling Out!

The ATA Annual Conference Exhibit Hall is already more than 50% sold; and with an expected 1,800 attendees at this year’s conference, it's looking like another early sell out. If your company is interested in reaching out to customers, make sure you reserve your booth soon—or your competition will beat you to it.

Also, be sure to check out all the ways to stand out from your competition. High visibility sponsorships and advertising space in the conference programs get you recognition beyond the Exhibit Hall. To secure the best of these limited opportunities, visit ATA Annual Conference Advertising Opportunities to learn more!

ATA 2012 Elections: Candidates Announced

ATA will hold its regularly scheduled election at the upcoming 2012 ATA Annual Conference in San Diego, California (October 24-27). Three directors will be elected. The candidates proposed by the Nominating and Leadership Development Committee are:

Director (three positions, three-year terms):
Anne Connor
Cristina Helmerichs
Odile Legeay
Corinne McKay
Faiza Sultan
Gail Tanaka Burns

Further nominations, supported by acceptance statements in writing by each additional nominee and a written petition signed by no fewer than 60 voting members, must be received by the Nominating and Leadership Development Committee by July 20. Acceptance statements and petitions may be faxed to the chair of the Nominating and Leadership Development Committee, Jiri Stejskal, in care of ATA Headquarters at (703) 683-6122.

Candidate statements and photos of the candidates will appear in the September issue of The ATA Chronicle and on ATA’s website.

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Pricing Strategies: Q&A

Did you attend ATA's Pricing Strategies for Translators and Interpreters webinar in February? If so, be sure to read presenter Judy Jenner's post webinar question-and-answer session. It's the featured article from the June issue of The ATA Chronicle and available online to members and non-members alike. Missed it? Didn't attend? Then look for the recorded version of this sold-out webinar on ATA's website. It's well worth it!

ATA and AFTI Scholarships

Each year, ATA and the American Foundation for Translation and Interpretation award several scholarships to encourage the next generation of translators and interpreters. You can help by forwarding information about the scholarships to colleagues and friends.

Julia Segall-Derfler Scholarship in Arabic or Hebrew Translation and Interpreting is given annually to a student who has demonstrated achievement in Arabic or Hebrew translation and/or interpreting. The individual must be enrolled in a degree program in Arabic or Hebrew.

The Harvie Jordan Scholarship is awarded to an ATA Spanish Language Division member in good standing to promote, encourage, and support leadership and professional development within the Division. The scholarship is given annually, in honor of Harvie Jordan’s lifetime contributions as a language professional.

The JTG Scholarship in Scientific and Technical Translation or Interpretation is presented to a student enrolled or planning to enroll in a degree program in scientific and technical translation or in interpreter training.

The Student Translation Award is presented to any graduate or undergraduate student, or group of students, for a literary or sci-tech translation or translation-related project. The award is given annually.

Coming Up in the June Issue of The ATA Chronicle

Pricing Strategies for Translators and Interpreters
Setting your rates is not about what someone else is charging. In lieu of her regular “Entrepreneurial Linguist” column, Judy Jenner answers questions from members about making the best pricing decisions for your business. (Judy Jenner)

Xbench and ChangeTracker: Two Freeware Tools for Translation Quality Assurance
An essential step before delivering our translations is confirming that their quality and consistency satisfy their customers’ needs. ApSIC’s Xbench and Technolex Translation Studio’s ChangeTracker are two Windows programs that can help achieve this goal. (Riccardo Schiaffino)

Translating Technical Manuals: Frequently Asked Questions
An examination of the dos and don’ts of translating technical manuals. (João Roque Dias)

Oral Flashcards: Tapping into Auditory and Vocal Skills to Improve Term Acquisition
Oral flashcards can facilitate acquisition and recall of content and help improve our efficiency as interpreters. (Julie A. Sellers)

Online access to The ATA Chronicle is included with your association membership. View the latest issues in PDF for articles that can give you a heads up on ideas, tools, and new ways of doing business.

And don't forget The Chronicle archives! ATA members have login access to every back issue from February 2000 to the present. Visit The ATA Chronicle Archives and log in.


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