ATA
Sessions by Specialization


Select a specialization below to see the sessions offered:

dvd This symbol indicates which sessions are included
in the ATA eConference.

session schedule
preconference seminars
sessions by language
sessions by specialization
speaker bios
ce credit
ATA ATA Activities FIN Financial Translation
I Interpreting IC Independent Contractors
L Literary Translation LAW Legal T&I
LSC Language Services Companies LT Language Technology
MED Medical T&I ST Science & Technology
T Translation TIP Translation & Interpreting Professions
TP Training and Pedagogy TRM Terminology
V Varia




ATA Activities
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ATA-1 Opening Session
Dorothee Racette and Caitilin Walsh
(Thursday, 8:30am-9:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Start the conference off right by attending the Opening Session!


ATA-2 Presentation of Candidates and Election
Dorothee Racette
(Thursday, 9:30am-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Hear the candidates for ATA's Board of Directors voice their opinions and then make them hear yours by exercising the right to vote. You must be an Active or Corresponding member of ATA to vote.


ATA-3 Orientation Session for First-Time Conference Attendees
Jill R. Sommer and Amanda B. Ennis
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Is this your first time attending ATA's Annual Conference? Do not be shy-we would love to meet you! The speakers will provide tips to help you get the most out of the conference and answer your questions. This will be a great opportunity to network with other first-time attendees from around the country and around the world!


ATA-4 ATA Mentoring Program Orientation
Susanne van Eyl, Eric Chiang, and Paula Gordon
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will provide an orientation for members interested in becoming a mentor or mentee in ATA's Mentoring Program.


ATA-5 Preparing to Take ATA's Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Geoffrey S. Koby
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This forum will be of interest to ATA members who seek a better understanding of ATA's certification exam. The speaker will answer questions about certification policies and procedures and how to prepare to take the exam.


ATA-6 Leadership in ATA and in Life
Ann G. Macfarlane
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will share insights, tips, and techniques gleaned during 20 years of volunteer service. This session will cover the nature of group interaction, the paradoxical role of the leader, why "groupthink" is an ever-present threat, how to evoke the best from your group, coming to terms with personal history, dealing with members who make us crazy, and why the drain of time and energy that volunteering demands is worth it in the end.


ATA-7 Annual Meeting of All Members
Dorothee Racette and Caitilin Walsh
(Friday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Find out what your association has accomplished and the goals that are being set. Members of the audience will be given an opportunity to ask questions and make comments to ATA Board members and committee chairs.


ATA-8 ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice Workshop
Courtney Searls-Ridge
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from 3:45pm-5:00pm to 2:00pm-3:15pm

While codes of ethics sometimes appear dry and boring as written, applying them in real life can create interesting and juicy dilemmas. We will examine how ATA's Code of Ethics and Professional Practice applies to real-life situations and discuss some of the gray areas of professional conduct in translation and interpreting. This session fulfills the ethics requirement for maintaining ATA certification.


ATA Activities
Related Sessions

C-3 Tips for Taking ATA's English>Chinese Certification Exam

IT-5 Tips and Strategies for Taking ATA's English>Italian Certification Exam

MEL-3 Understanding and Passing the Arabic>English Certification Exam

Financial Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

FIN-1 Hot Topics in Financial Translation
Javier Gil
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

With 51% of chief executive officers worldwide believing we are entering a second Great Depression (Business Leaders Survey, KPMG, February 2012), this session will explore what the current business conditions may mean for financial translators. Having worked in the industry for over 13 years, the speaker will address some of the most relevant developments affecting the main financial sectors-from asset management and accounting to banking and insurance-and what the implications could be from a translator's point of view, including some of the "hot terms" being introduced as a result of new regulations.


FIN-2 NEW SESSION
Understanding Financial Jargon
Silvana Teresa Debonis
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Many analysts who write economic and financial market reports make use of expressions and terms that are difficult to understand for those who are outside the financial field. In this presentation, we will analyze extracts from actual reports and other publications in order to explain what they mean and how they should be interpreted by the translator This presentation is in English for translators of any language combination and will not involve any bilingual translation.


Financial Translation
Related Sessions

SEM-G Translating Financial Analysis (Spanish>English)

SEM-L Risk Management: New Challenges in the Translation Industry

G-4 Developments in German Accounting Standards 2012: Principles, Terminology, and Translation

IT-10 The Use of XBRL in Financial Translations

J-4 Introduction to Translating Japanese Financial Documents

K-3 Translating IRS Tax Forms and Publications into Korean

TRM-2 Enlarge Your Territory: Self-Training in New Areas of Expertise

Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 Interpreting Trauma
Christiane Abel
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will explain how interpreters can best prepare for and cope with assignments dealing with deeply traumatic events, and ultimately decide whether they are a good fit for a particular job. The discussion will draw from the speaker's experience as an interpreter for the UN International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and subsequent interpreting assignments. Parallels and differences will be established between the work of an interpreter in international crime hearings and a medical or court interpreter in the U.S.


I-2 Interpreters Division Annual Meeting
Thelma Ferry
(Thursday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Interpreters Division administrative officers will discuss the annual report summarizing the 2012 year-in-review activities, discuss issues of interest with the membership, outline the plans, goals, and objectives for 2013, and future collaborative efforts for the advancement of the profession. The annual meeting offers members an opportunity to meet colleagues, share insights, voice opinions, make suggestions, and become involved. We invite all ID members, nonmembers, and conference attendees to attend.


I-3 Conference Interpreting: Alliances, Common Goals, and Unity
Linda Fitchett
(Thursday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Developing international cooperation and alliances strengthens the professional image of conference interpreters worldwide. This session will focus on effective methods for pooling resources and disseminating ideas to help achieve common goals for the profession (e.g., maintaining or improving quality performance and working conditions). Working together in vital areas such as interpreter training helps us succeed in a profession where Global English, the changing needs of clients, and the increasing use of technology are constant challenges.


I-4 Market Manners in the Conference Interpreting World
Yuliya Tsaplina, Pablo C. Chang-Castillo, and Julien Brasseur
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Thursday to Friday

Should I accept a pro-bono assignment? What do I do if I find that I am assigned to work with an incompetent partner? How do I manage my availability and conflicting "options?" How much information can I disclose on Facebook and Twitter? Professional interpreters encounter these and many other dilemmas on a regular basis, yet there is no one definitive answer. This session by members of the International Association of Conference Interpreters will consider various market scenarios. Different ways of dealing with these dilemmas will be discussed while taking both ethical and business considerations into account.


I-5 Stress Busters for Interpreters
Julie P. Burns
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreters face multiple sources of stress that can affect job performance and long-term health and well-being. Stress can affect concentration, memory, and the ability to handle the mentally strenuous complexity of language conversion. Irritability, sleeplessness, headaches, anxiety, increased blood pressure, decreased immunity, and heart disease are all linked to stress. You will learn and practice simple and powerful techniques to change your stress responses before they become a problem. You will leave empowered to take care of yourself so you can stay healthy, avoid burnout, and enjoy your challenging role as an interpreter.


I-6 Practical Listening Skills For Interpreters
Teodora B. Burian
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

To deliver the message from the source to the target language, a successful interpreter anticipates, listens actively, processes the meaning, and monitors his or her delivery. The listener's familiarity with the topic and situation are not enough. The listener needs to pay attention to the complexity of the message, rate of speech, and accent. Focusing on the crucial need to improve listening skills, this session will include practical exercises to enhance effective communication. A handout listing tips to improve listening skills will be provided.


I-7 Vocal Skills for Interpreters: Techniques and Tools to Preserve and Enhance Your Speech
Michelle Lambeau
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The successful interpreter commands a voice that is pleasant to hear, strong enough to adapt to any setting, and trained to endure for hours at a time and days at a stretch. And yet the skills required to develop, protect, and enhance the voice are almost never part of an interpreter's formal training. This seminar will offer a brief introduction to vocal physiology and focus on techniques for posture, breathing, phonation, and resonance that have been adapted for interpreters. Participants will explore and practice many techniques and tools, individually and in groups, that will give them the confidence of a reliable voice.


I-8 The Practice of Reflective Interpreting for Skills Development and to Counteract Fatigue
Esther Neblina
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss the use of reflective practice in interpreting as a technique for quick, easy-to-implement personal assessment of skills, fatigue, or other factors that may interfere with the interpreting process. This session is divided into three phases: 1) the interpreting event and its common pitfalls; 2) the purpose of reflective practice beyond simple monitoring; and 3) an interactive exercise on reflective interpreting. This session will teach interpreters at all levels to identify strengths and weaknesses in order to create individualized action plans. Note: Each participant *must* bring a portable recorder and earpiece for practice and self-assessment.


I-9 The Challenges of Interpreting for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Medical and Legal Settings
Maryam Abdi
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Friday to Thursday

The number of refugees and asylum seekers in the U.S. has increased over the years and shows no sign of abating. This has increased the demand for interpreters who are well versed on the complex issues facing refugees and asylum seekers. In this session, interpreters will learn what the challenges are and how to work with refugees and asylum seekers successfully. Interpreters will learn how to identify underlying problems that hinder the quality of the interpretation and how to prevent common cultural mishaps and misunderstandings.


I-10 Consecutive 2.0: New Technology for an Old Technique
Franz Poechhacker
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Practiced since ancient times, consecutive interpreting remained without a special designation until the 1920s, when higher demands and competition from the simultaneous mode shaped its classic manifestation based on note-taking. Less than a century later, technological innovation is transforming this old technique. This session will review the emergence of technology-assisted interpreting in the 21st century, focusing on digital recorder-based consecutive ("SimConsec") interpreting as well as Web-based remote interpreting in dialogue settings. The findings from experimental research and an ongoing pilot study will be presented to demonstrate both the potential and possible pitfalls of consecutive interpreting enhanced by information and communication technologies.


I-11 Health Care Interpreting Roles for a New Millennium
Tamesia K. Sosa
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will introduce fresh perspectives on how health care interpreting roles are evolving. Alternatives to the traditional roles of conduit, clarifier, cultural broker, and advocate will be explored through the lens of a new model. Are interpreters invisible or do they influence the encounter? Are there effective ways to handle cultural differences besides cultural brokering? Should interpreters advocate or educate? Attendees will participate in interactive discussions and activities to learn, explore, engage, and reflect on the most relevant topics in health care interpreting today. A role-play scenario will be included.


I-12 The Globetrotting Interpreter
Yvette Hovsepian Bearce
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

With the demand for interpreters and translators increasing in the global community, more expert linguists are considering overseas assignments. This session will serve as a step-by-step guide for interpreters or translators planning to work overseas. Topics will include preparing for an assignment, pre-departure and post-departure preparations, and some dos and don'ts for those working overseas.


I-13 Decoding Other People's Accents: Practical Phonology for Interpreters
James P. Kirchner
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreting can be tough when you do not understand someone's accent. The rules associated with pronunciation are inconsistent among languages, resulting in many variations of how someone sounds when speaking. However, there are a few basic principles that can help you get accustomed to all of these accents, and this session will serve as a crash course to get you started. Topics will include the various aspects of phonology, phonotactics, metrical phonology, hypercorrection, spelling, and prosody, all of which are helpful in spotting pronunciation patterns in non-native English. These principles will be illustrated with examples from speakers of Chinese, Spanish, Chaldean, Russian, Japanese, and other languages.


I-14 Court Interpreting and Ethics
Yvette Hovsepian Bearce
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will review professional and ethical responsibilities for court interpreters and discuss some of the most common and difficult situations that arise while interpreting for non-English-speaking individuals. This session will be of use to interpreters at all levels. New interpreters will learn how to integrate themselves into the team of court officers and follow the specific guidelines set for official court interpreters. Interpreters will also learn how ethical guidelines for interpreters in other states may differ slightly from those set by their own states, and how to seek out this information prior to appearing for the assignment.


I-15 CANCELLED
Interpreting in Schools
Guillermo Diaz
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




I-16 A Taste of Webcast Interpreting
Cristina Silva
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Webcast interpreting is fast becoming a new way in which interpreters are offering their services. In this interactive and multimedia session, the speakers will improvise a webcast situation involving a free conferencing service and participants' cell phones. Volunteers will take turns interpreting from Spanish/French/Portuguese<>English, but those working in other languages should definitely attend. After the exercise, the speakers will offer a debriefing and discuss best practices. Participants should come with a fully charged cell phone and be ready to volunteer.


Interpreting
Related Sessions

SEM-D Tips and Exercises to Improve Your Sight Translation Skills for Legal Interpreting

SEM-K Simultaneous Interpreting: Mission (NOT!) Impossible for Medical and Community Interpreters

C-5 Behind the Lines: Telephonic Interpreting

J-3 Linguistic Cues for Prediction in Japanese>English Simultaneous Interpreting

J-6 Japanese Interpreting in a Military Setting: Unique Needs, Settings, and Methods

J-7 The Misunderstood and Undervalued Role of the Check (Not Czech!) Interpreter

LAW-2 Revealing the Secrets of State Court Interpreter Certification: Confessions from a Test Proctor

LAW-3 The Client-Attorney Privilege and the Interpreter's Duty to Maintain Confidentiality

LAW-4 The Dissection of a Successfully Interpreted Legal Proceeding

LAW-5 Essential Anatomy and Physiology for Judiciary Interpreters

LAW-6 Immigration Jargon: Interpreting in a World Apart

LT-3 Web Tools and Practices for Interpreting Preparation

MED-4 Dilemmas in the Co-Construction of Pain Ratings among Providers, Language Interpreters, and Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Patients

MED-5 Becoming a Certification Subject Matter Expert

MED-9 National Accreditation for Medical Interpreting Training Program

MED-10 The California Healthcare Interpreting Association Standards

S-6 Not Your Father's Bureau: A Look at Today's Roles of Linguists within the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Independent Contractors
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

IC-1 A True Business Approach to Freelance Translation Can Help Streamline Processes, Boost Efficiency, and Improve the Bottom Line
Richard Gliech
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Beyond linguistic competence, a successful independent contractor must also exhibit a variety of business skills. This session will discuss approaches, tools, and solutions that help improve working processes and minimize non-billable work. Issues covered will include project management, bookkeeping, accounting, taxes, equipment, and third-party professional services. The importance of understanding one's own market, competing on one's strengths, projecting a professional image, and cultivating business-to-business relationships with customers will also be discussed. This business-oriented approach can help maximize an independent contractor's profit, provide a consistent and predictable income with benefits, optimize available free time, and establish a durable and reliable professional activity.


IC-2 Creating and Using Client-Specific Translation Style Guides
Christopher D. Mellinger
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will discuss the benefits of creating client-specific translation style guides and offer suggestions on how to implement these resources into a translator's or agency's workflow. Particular emphasis will be placed on the types of information that should be documented in a translation style guide, and how these resources can be used to improve consistency and translation quality within a particular translation, among translation team members, and across multiple projects. In addition, the case will be made for using computer-assisted translation tools in conjunction with a translation style guide.


IC-3 The Care and Feeding of Direct Clients
Chris Durban
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Statistics tell us that the demand for translation is rising. But anyone pitching his or her services knows, too, that demand is bifurcating-on the one hand, an increasingly price-sensitive bulk market; on the other, a premium segment. Within that premium segment is a market with its own demands and rewards: direct clients. This session will examine the skills, techniques, and reflexes that translators need to develop if they want to link up and work successfully with direct clients.


IC-4 How to Market Yourself Effectively to Language Services Providers
George Rimalower
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner; Presented in: English)




IC-5 Take Back Control: Getting the Work You Want
Maggey Oplinger
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




IC-6 Win-Win: How to Set a Fair Price for Your Work
Jonathan T. Hine
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators and interpreters are in business. This session will cover the elements of budgeting and business planning. The methodology will help participants develop personal criteria for accepting or rejecting freelance assignments, balancing employment offers, and choosing alternatives for business expansion. Calculating a break-even price and tracking sales volume and revenue will also be covered.


IC-7 10 Habits of Highly Successful Translators and Interpreters
Judy A. Jenner
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Being an excellent translator or interpreter is not enough to attract and keep customers. Which characteristics do successful entrepreneurs in the languages industry share? Inspired by Stephen Covey's management classic The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, the speaker will outline 10 habits that any linguist must have to succeed in the marketplace. This session will focus on customer service, communication skills, negotiating, computer proficiency, networking, and more. Find out why you need to be a Porsche, not a Kia, why the client is almost always right, why there is no crying and whining in the industry, and how to set clear expectations.


IC-8 How to Use Search Engine Optimization to Attract More Visitors to Your Website or Blog
Fabio M. Said
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Language professionals who have a website or blog know that just launching their content online is not enough. You have to work hard to make it visible. This session will show how you can benefit from search engine optimization (SEO) to attract a larger audience to your website or blog, resulting in more business. Topics will include using HTML tags and meta tags, interacting with Web crawlers, managing internal and external links, choosing titles and labels, working with Google's Webmaster Tools, and using visitor tracking tools to check your content's popularity.


IC-9 Creating a Website for Your Freelance Translation/Interpreting Business
Tess M. Whitty
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Deciding to create a website for your professional freelance translation business is one of the best ways to maximize your business success. This session will show you how to create your own website at no or low cost-without having to learn HTML or hire a Web designer. The speaker will discuss what content you should include and how to make it more visible online. Specific examples of website content for linguists will be provided, in addition to some dos and don'ts in website creation and maintenance.


IC-10 Making the Whole Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts: Virtual Partnerships Among Freelance Translators
Friderike A. Butler and Jeana Clark
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Freelance translators have much to gain by proactively seeking and building cooperative relationships within their peer groups. This session will highlight the benefits, best business practices, and tools for successful teamwork and professional enrichment through virtual partnerships.


IC-11 Translations That Can Change People's Lives
Attila Piroth
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translating for humanitarian organizations is a common way to gain one's first experience in the industry. Such work is often done pro bono in a crowdsourced setting. But apart from the public relations value and the satisfaction of doing something good, how can translators benefit from such work? Based on experience, the speaker will show how a well-built team approach can provide outstanding networking opportunities and kick-start a beginning translator's career. Making a strong link with community projects in the for-profit sector, the speaker will also argue why the complete demonetization of the humanitarian translation sector is not the optimal choice for translators and humanitarian organizations alike.


IC-12 Improve Your Negotiation and Communication Skills as a Freelancer
Ioana C. Radoi and Judson Odell
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Being a freelancer means running a business. We, however, typically focus on developing our translation skills, and not on the skills that will increase our profitability, such as negotiating better rates, terms, or deadlines. This session will help improve participants' communication and negotiation skills. We will discuss the differences between how translators and clients understand translation services and identify common communication gaps and misunderstandings. We will then suggest ways to present services that highlight the added value and benefits freelancers provide their clients, thus better positioning them in negotiations. Finally, we will conduct hands-on training in basic negotiation skills through role-play activities.


Independent Contractors
Related Sessions

SEM-A Beyond the Basics of Freelancing

SEM-B Why We Are Management Accountants, Like It or Not

SEM-H Working the Room

SEM-I Negotiation Skills for Translators: The Win-Win Process

LSC-3 Microtranslations: Dealing with the New Economic Reality

LSC-4 Selling When Nobody is Buying

LSC-5 Customer Service for a Sustainable Translation Business

LSC-8 Making It Work: Collaboration Between Agencies and Freelancers in the Translation Business

SL-8 How to Enter the Russian Translation Market

T-11 How to Be an Outstanding Diplomatic Translator

Literary Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 Sexist Language in Translation and Interpreting
Laurence H. Bogoslaw
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Gender-marked language is widely recognized as "sexist." This session will discuss what to do with apparent instances of sexist language when translating to and from English. What is sexist language, and why should we avoid it? Why strive for a gender-neutral translation if the source text is sexist? When can we not avoid gender-marked language in translation? When should we not avoid it? Enlightening examples include phrases in English, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and more.


L-2 Literary Division Annual Meeting
Emilia I. Balke
(Thursday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

We will discuss the Literary Division activities in 2012 as part of a long-term strategy. Experienced and novice literary translators are invited to come, introduce themselves, meet peers, and learn about Listserve, Source, and our plans for 2013.


L-3 The Fifth Business in Five Languages
Zuzana Kulhankova
(Thursday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Readers of The New York Times voted The Fifth Business by Robertson Davies one of the 100 best novels of the 20th century. Zuzana Kulhankova received the Canada Council for the Arts International Translation Award for translating it into Czech. In this session, she will point out the challenges she encountered and compare her solutions with those of the German, Spanish, and French translators of the novel. The different, yet equal, facilities of five languages to express identical ideas will be discussed.


L-4 Defining Writing Style
Lisa C. Carter
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

As translators, we must capture not only words and the meaning behind them, but the style in which the original work was written. In this session, we will examine the elements that constitute style, from vocabulary to sentence construction to cultural and author idiosyncrasies. Participants will follow a process to determine specific elements of style in an English text.


L-5 The Einstein Enigma: A Case Study in Literary Translation
Lisa C. Carter
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




L-6 Re-Translation: Do We Really Need It?
Inga Michaeli
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The re-translation of literary classics is becoming more popular. Some have said that the rich Hebrew of the past is lost altogether in these new translations, while others maintain that earlier translations are fast becoming obsolete. Some argue that this new trend is motivated purely by economic reasons. The speaker will discuss various arguments for and against re-translation. Many examples will be taken from two books the speaker has re-translated in recent years (Edgar Wallace's Bosambo of the River and Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead). All examples in Hebrew will be explained in English.


L-7 Specific Use of Metaphor in Fiction and Its Translation
Roza Allyametdinovna Ayupova
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Beginner; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from 11:30am-12:30pm to 8:30am-9:30am

The use of metaphor plays a large role in works of fiction. Authors will often use one metaphor that makes up the basis for the image of the entire work. The speaker will analyze the methods of translating metaphors used in works by Ray Bradbury and other American writers into Russian.


L-8 Translating the Untranslatable
Inga Michaeli
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translation is like walking in a dense forest, on a winding and sometimes treacherous path; you need to tread carefully, improvise, compromise, and make bold choices every step of the way. The speaker will discuss examples of language-specific obstacles encountered when translating literary works from English into Hebrew. Topics will include wordplay, names, gender, and dialects. Participants will work on a few short texts from some of the speaker's recent translations. This session will focus mainly on the unique challenges the speaker faced while working on Amitabh Ghosh's Sea of Poppies. Knowledge of Hebrew is a plus, but not mandatory.


L-9 CANCELLED
Translating a Poem: Balancing Between the Literal and the Emotional
Ghada Alatrash
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




Literary Translation
Related Sessions

C-4 Logical Lapses and Trouble with Tenses: Reflections on the Challenges of Chinese>English Literary Translation

C-9 Translating Classical Chinese Buddhist Texts

IT-6 Author and Translator: A Success Story, Part I

IT-7 Author and Translator: A Success Story, Part II

SL-2 Approximately 25 Dreams of Dagestan

Legal T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 Writing About Patents
Bruce D. Popp
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Patent translators are often called upon to translate related administrative or court documents that discuss patents. Such documents include communication to and from patent examiners and patent offices, briefs, motions, decisions for revoking or sustaining patents, and court arguments and decisions in patent infringement cases. This session will examine the considerations, concepts, and terminology used to discuss whether a patent should be issued, revoked, or enforced.


LAW-2 Revealing the Secrets of State Court Interpreter Certification: Confessions from a Test Proctor
Burno Romero
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

An increasing number of states are using the examinations offered by the Consortium for Language Access in the Courts to qualify interpreters for legal interpreting. Why is the passing rate for state certification so low? The national average is 26%. What is in the exam that trips candidates? How does the exam measure your abilities and what does it say about your skills and preparation as an interpreter? The speaker, a test proctor, will discuss the state court interpreter written and oral exams.


LAW-3 The Client-Attorney Privilege and the Interpreter's Duty to Maintain Confidentiality
Tony A. Rosado
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Since interpreters often handle sensitive information, maintaining confidentiality is a must. We will cover the ethical and legal considerations that affect the performance of a legal interpreter. This advanced session will compare client-attorney privilege and the interpreter's duty to uphold confidentiality.


LAW-4 CANCELLED
The Dissection of a Successfully Interpreted Legal Proceeding
Maria C. de la Vega
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LAW-5 Essential Anatomy and Physiology for Judiciary Interpreters
Jennifer De La Cruz
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreters can be caught off guard when it comes to interpreting the details surrounding wounds, injuries, and common medical conditions discussed in both criminal and civil litigation. This session will provide judiciary interpreters with an overview of medical terminology through root words, prefixes, and suffixes, as well as a review of key body descriptors and structures and the healing process. Major themes covered will include head injuries, bruising, and skin lesions.


LAW-6 Immigration Jargon: Interpreting in a World Apart
Francesca Samuel
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will look at the differences and similarities of standard legal terminology versus immigration jargon. The speaker will also provide information about the preparation and translation of documents related to immigration and customs enforcement and discuss interpreting Executive Office of Immigration Review proceedings. Participants will receive copies of monolingual and bilingual (Spanish<>English) glossaries containing terms associated with immigration and a list of definitions of the different sections of the law.


LAW-7 Political Differences Between the U.S. and Europe from a Translator's Perspective
Neil A. Gouw
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English with Dutch and German examples)

The translation of political terms can be a challenging undertaking and is comparable to the intricacies that arise when translating legal terms. A political system, much like the legal system, is country-specific, as is its use of language and the culture embedded in this language. How are key political terms accurately and fairly represented in a different language? This session will focus on the art of political translation and the challenges faced by the translator. The differences between the U.S. and Dutch political systems will be discussed as an example.


Legal T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-D Tips and Exercises to Improve Your Sight Translation Skills for Legal Interpreting

SEM-F English-Spanish Criminal Procedure Law Terminology: Latin-American Reforms

SEM-M Advanced Spanish>English Legal Translation Workshop

C-1 Nuts and Bolts of Chinese<>English Translation III: Dealing with Politically- and Legally-Oriented Excerpts and Terms

C-2 Exploring Chinese<>English Sight Translation Techniques

F-5 Translating French Corporate Law into English

F-6 Quality Control of Patent Abstract Translation into French at the World Intellectual Property Organization

I-9 The Challenges of Interpreting for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Medical and Legal Settings

I-14 Court Interpreting and Ethics

IT-9 Fuggedaboutit: Translating Problematic Terms in U.S. and Italian Criminal Law

K-1 Patent Translation: Korean>English

K-2 Legal Interpreting: Certification and Beyond

K-9 Understanding and Interpreting Proverbs and Idioms from Korean<>English

P-3 When a Claim Is Not a Claim: Criminal Terminology in Brazilian Law

S-1 Criminal Justice Terms 101 (English>Spanish)

S-2 A Federal Criminal Case: From Initial Appearance to Sentencing and Beyond

S-3

S-11 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts

S-12 An Overview of Spanish Monolingual Law Dictionaries

SL-4 Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian: Translating and Interpreting War Crimes Trials

TRM-1 Gangs and Guns

Language Services Companies
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LSC-1 How to Bring Terminology Management to Center Stage: Case Studies of How It Can Make or Break a Project
Cristina Silva
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Thursday to Friday

In most projects, terminology management is done on a haphazard or ad hoc basis. Yet, poor terminology management or lack thereof can make or break a project. It can take time, money, negotiation, and technology to change one term, whether it is in one file or across 23 languages. Through real case studies of several types of translation projects, the speaker will suggest terminology management best practices for a successful project.


LSC-2 U.S. Government Contracting Processes for Translation and Interpreting
Jennifer DeCamp, Rusty Shughart, Joy Miller, Joseph Mazza, and Jiri Stejskal
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will address the following questions regarding the business of translating and interpreting with the U.S. government: 1) How do I find which groups in the U.S. government need translation services? 2) How can I market my services to the U.S. government? 3) What methods do I use to get U.S. government translation and interpreting contracts? 4) Why is the General Services Administration Schedule important, and how can I get my services listed in this schedule? 5) What tools and standards should I use in order to facilitate getting contracts and working with the U.S. government?


LSC-3 Microtranslations: Dealing with the New Economic Reality
Renato S. Beninatto
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Some call it chunking, some call it drips, some call it streaming translations. The reality is that the market demands and technology makes it possible to deal with smaller projects with ever shorter turnaround times. The speaker will discuss how language services providers and translators can deal with this new market characteristic.


LSC-4 Selling When Nobody is Buying
Ray Reyes
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

There is no doubt that this is a very difficult time to sell. To make matters worse, most sales managers are using techniques that no longer work. The world of sales has changed, but no one has informed the sales team. It is time to face reality. Since what worked in the past does not necessarily work today, we must learn to distinguish what sells. A depressed economy offers great opportunities for the sales team. This session will provide the tools and concepts needed to restore confidence, build powerful alliances, acquire new customers, and become more profitable in your language business.


LSC-5 Customer Service for a Sustainable Translation Business
Marcela A. Jenney-Reyes
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

To stand out from the competition, outstanding customer service is critical. Translation services providers, regardless of size, should establish quality assurance guidelines to help them sustain a superior level of customer service. This session will address how translators can serve as responsible customer service agents. By implementing proper customer service practices you can differentiate your business to win clients and beat competitors.


LSC-6 Translation Company Division Annual Meeting
Rina Ne'eman
(Saturday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Join fellow translation company owners and project managers to discuss matters of common interest, critical business issues, and what you would like to see in terms of future Translation Company Division meetings and activities.


LSC-7 The Clock Is Ticking: Tips to Handle Rush Projects Successfully
George Rimalower and Michael Bearden
(Saturday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In this era of fast-paced communications, every moment counts. We will discuss strategies and tasks translation teams can employ to maximize efficiency in the face of aggressive deadlines. We will track a project from inception to completion and discuss methods for streamlining the translation process. Topics will include proactive and transparent communication techniques for project managers, technological tools, and building trustworthy translation teams to scale.


LSC-8 Making It Work: Collaboration Between Agencies and Freelancers in the Translation Business
Maureen Garelick
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

There are enough language services providers (LSPs) globally to enable freelancers wishing to work with agencies to pick and choose. This session will address how LSPs and freelancers can collaborate constructively, promoting a frank and respectful discussion about their partnership. Using an interactive format, the speakers will address such topics as how to get onboard and get noticed by an agency, how agencies can most effectively qualify freelancers (tests, references, and certification), how to negotiate rates and terms, how to satisfy the end client, and how to assess quality.


LSC-9 NEW SESSION
Government Translations in the Twenty-first Century
Maria Brau and Peter Sursi
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A large portion of government translation work is increasingly being directed towards online exchanges, and audio translation is no longer confined to transcripts and documents for use in court. The translation of chats, blogs, and audio now proceeds in tandem with intelligence collection. Analysis is often required, and missing a deadline constitutes a risk. Because traditional skills are often inadequate for these tasks, recruiting and hiring translators require a different set of qualifications, and both tests and testing standards must be redirected. At the FBI, recruitment and testing are being retooled to ensure a pool of suitable applicants.


Language Services Companies
Related Sessions

F-6 Quality Control of Patent Abstract Translation into French at the World Intellectual Property Organization

T-4 File Conditioning for Localization: Saving Time and Money in Multilingual DTP

Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 Using Online Translation Memories and Corpora to Improve Translation Quality: Seeing the Trees from the Forest
Miguel A. Jimenez-Crespo
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Numerous multilingual translation memories or parallel corpora are available online. Search engines such as Linguee, TAUS, Webitext, OPUS, Mymemory, and Glosbe assist in identifying previous translations of any term, lexical item, or phrase. This session will offer a framework to optimize the use of existing online corpora and translation memories with the goal of improving translation quality. Tips and principles to use these corpora efficiently and effectively will be offered.


LT-2 Tools for Quality Assurance and Translation Memory Maintenance
Tuomas S. Kostiainen
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

All modern computer-assisted translation tools include a wide variety of quality assurance (QA) functions, but these functions are often underutilized by translators. This session will provide an overview of these built-in QA functions in tools like Trados Studio and memoQ. Topics will also include how standalone QA tools such as QA Distiller, ErrorSpy, Verifika, Okapi CheckMate, and Xbench can be used for checking translations and translation memories for consistency, terminology, numbers, punctuation, etc., and how more sophisticated text editors can be used for editing translation memories. A brief introduction to regular expressions and their use in customizing QA checks will also be included.


LT-3 CANCELLED
Web Tools and Practices for Interpreting Preparation

(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)




LT-4 Language Technology Division Annual Meeting
Laurie M. Gerber, Michael Wahlster, and Michael Metzger
(Friday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Language Technology Division Annual Meeting provides an opportunity to meet with members, as well as interested nonmembers, and to update all attendees about division activities. Volunteers will be encouraged to participate in the LTD and we will help prospective volunteers to commit to contributing. We welcome all attendees who are interested in Language Technology to help the LTD define and focus content offerings to meet ATA member needs.


LT-5 Subtitling Motion Pictures: Techniques and Technologies
Alain Martinossi
(Friday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In the age of digital cinema and online streaming, subtitling requires more than mere linguistic expertise. In order to appeal to prospective clients, translators must hone their computer skills and develop an understanding of the specific technological requirements inherent in the process of creating subtitles. This session will focus on the techniques and the technology involved in the creation of subtitles for motion pictures released by all major studios. Participants will be given an overview of the process and concrete examples of how subtitling software can be used as a translating tool in order to meet clients' expectations.


LT-6 ATA Translation Tools Forum
Michael Metzger
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Come and join us for this annual event where we'll introduce a new twist on the popular "speed networking" format. A panel of translation tool vendors will be given a set amount of time to discuss their tool. Each vendor will provide a brief introduction to their tool and then highlight what they consider to be a top feature, as well as a hidden gem. This session is aimed at experienced translation tool users who want to discover a feature unknown to them and be taken for a surprise ride in a fast-paced and focused setting.


LT-7 The Desktopless Translation Office
John Di Rico
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will demonstrate how you can shift your translation business from a bricks and mortar office with desktop computer, filing cabinets, and dusty reams of paper to a nomadic laptop anywhere in the world. The speaker will describe how to define your goals, eliminate the unnecessary, simplify and automate your workflow, and move your business completely online. This session is for translators looking to adapt their business to a lifestyle that values free time and freedom of location.


LT-8 Tips and Tricks for Full Post-Editing

(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will provide best practices for higher efficiency in machine translation (MT) full post-editing (i.e., with final quality equal to a translation from scratch). The speakers will look at the use of automated quality assurance tools for initial diagnose of MT quality, the evaluation of samples to forecast productivity gains, advanced editing with macros, and the gathering of structured feedback.


LT-9 Building Your Own Statistical Machine Translation Systems and Integrating Them with Your Translation Memory Tools

(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Statistical machine translation (MT) engines can be developed quickly and give a good boost to your productivity. You can use your translation memories as training corpora (so that output is optimized for texts you translate regularly) and supplement them with publicly available material. The engine can then be plugged to your translation memory. (You will get draft translations for no matching segments and store the final reviewed translation for later reuse.) This session will show how to prepare corpora for training, build your engine, handle file formats, and integrate MT and translation memories.


LT-10 Machine Translation in Practice
Mike Dillinger
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Machine translation (MT) software is attracting attention from translation clients: government organizations, companies, and language services providers (LSPs). This is forcing translators to make a difficult decision-work with the technology or find a way to work around it. This session is intended to help you decide. The speaker will provide an overview of how LSPs and companies use MT and what the translator's role is in this new business model. The most common scenario is to "post-edit" instead of translate. What do post-editing assignments look like? What do clients expect from you? How do you price these assignments? How can you learn to post-edit effectively?


LT-11 Dancing with a Dragon: Advancing Productivity and Quality Using Voice Recognition in CAT Tools
Andrew D. Levine and Thomas Ennis Fennell
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Voice recognition can increase translation speed and quality dramatically. The speakers will analyze the efficiency of dictation and offer tips to avoid common start-up problems with voice input and overcome typical speed bumps such as misheard words. Participants will learn how to customize voice control to automate their interaction with computer-assisted translation (CAT) tools. The speakers will offer their vision of the future, showing what CAT with deep integration of voice recognition might look and sound like. Demonstrations will be in Trados and MemoQ.


LT-12 NEW SESSION
Open Standards Can Improve Your Translations
Asa Ahlgren
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Effective translation requires expert language skills and file handling. We all receive various file formats from different tools that require time to process-time better used for translating. Open standards and open source tools help us do this more effectively. The use of localization standards makes it easier to meet customer requirements by reducing the difficulty of dealing with multiple file formats. Participants will learn how open standards and open source software streamline the interface among the tools and improve the ability to work with different file formats.


Language Technology
Related Sessions

J-5 Productivity Tools for Into-Japanese Translation

K-4 CAT Tools for Korean Translators

MEL-1 Technical Challenges Facing Arabic Translators

T-4 File Conditioning for Localization: Saving Time and Money in Multilingual DTP

TP-3 Teaching Translation Studies Students How Machine Translation Works

TP-4 Teaching Computer-Assisted Translation in the 21st Century

TRM-3 Crowdsourcing Large and Complex Lists: Company Names

Medical T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 Basics of Immunology
Tapani J. Ronni
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will introduce the basic concepts of immunology. Areas to be covered include the germ theory of disease, how an immune response forms against the invading microbe (T and B cells, innate immunity), and immunological diagnostic tools used in medicine. Autoimmune diseases and their treatment with gene therapy will also be covered briefly. This session should be useful for medical/scientific translators and interpreters.


MED-2 So You Are Not a Doctor: Taking the Plunge into Medical Translation without an MD
Erin M. Lyons
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Medical and life sciences translation is an intimidating specialization for linguists lacking a scientific or technical background. The technical terminology, handwritten notes from physicians, acronyms, complex medical phraseology, and regulatory requirements can leave novices treading in troubled waters. In this session, we will tackle the primary barriers to entry, explore linguistic and medical resources to build a better understanding of medical terminology and concepts, and examine the structure and scope of commonly translated documents (reports, journal articles, regulatory submissions, trial protocols, etc.). We will also discuss industry standards and language- and locale-specific challenges.


MED-3 Medical Division Annual Meeting
Madalena Sanchez Zampaulo and Antonio E. Guerra
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Medical Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other medical translators and interpreters. Participants will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2013. All division members are encouraged to attend and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


MED-4 Dilemmas in the Co-Construction of Pain Ratings among Providers, Language Interpreters, and Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Patients
Claudia V. Angelelli
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Pain is perceived and communicated differently by members of various cultural groups. The medical interpreter is often responsible for making that communication possible. Pain is such a common topic in the medical encounter that it is now regarded by some as the "fifth vital sign." Numerous scales have been established to quantify pain. Patients are asked frequently to score the intensity of their pain on a numerical pain rating scale. The speaker will review transcripts from a database of interpreted medical encounters, focusing on the role of the interpreter during discussions about pain.


MED-5 Becoming a Certification Subject Matter Expert
Elizabeth Nguyen
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session is intended for interpreters who want to develop leadership skills and apply them to the certification process undertaken by the Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters. It will shed light on the requirements, the selection of subject matter experts involved at the different stages of certification development. It will explore the qualifications and responsibilities of test item writers, reviewers, raters, and other volunteers involved in certification development. This session is for those interpreters who want to contribute to the advancement of the profession in a very tangible way. It will include a mini simulation of an item writing and reviewing meeting.


MED-6 Understanding the Science Behind the Clinical Trials You Translate
Denise Anne Figlewicz
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Disorders affecting the nervous system will become increasingly common as the population ages. Participants will learn what makes up a nerve cell, what nerve cells are involved in the most common adult onset of neurodegenerative disorders, what clinical trails have taught us about the functional parts inside nerve cells, and how nerve cells communicate with the cells around them. Participants will also discover how the unique properties of different populations of nerve cells allow for the design of drugs that could slow or halt the progression of a specific nervous system disorder.


MED-7 Interplay of Basic Scientific Research and Human Genetics Studies: A Guide to Understanding and Deciphering Inherited Disorders
Denise Anne Figlewicz
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Most people understand the concept of traits that "run in the family." Unfortunately, sometimes the trait is a serious medical disorder. It is possible to identify the gene(s) that underlie inherited disorders. This session will show how the identification of a gene can help accelerate an understanding of the disease mechanism. Taking advantage of knowledge already available from "bench science," additional basic research can then suggest the identity of genes underlying related inherited conditions. Identification of genes allows genetic counseling for families and, combined with "bench science," guides the development of therapies for the medical disorder.


MED-8 Translating Manuals for Medical Devices with English>German Examples
Maria Rosdolsky
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

New discoveries and inventions in recent years for the purpose of advancing diagnostics and therapy brought with them new terminologies for medical devices. In order to translate medical device user manuals successfully, the translator must understand the source text, the audience (medical personnel or patients), the style (depending on the style of the source text and the audience), the choice of terms in the target language (especially if they were not previously translated), consistency of terminology, and quality control. The speaker will discuss each of these items as well as possible sources and consequences of errors. English>German examples will be provided.


MED-9 National Accreditation for Medical Interpreting Training Program
Izabel Arocha
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Medical interpreting training programs vary in quantity, quality, and scope. How does one know if training programs are accepting individuals who are truly bilingual or graduating individuals who are truly competent? The International Medical Interpreters Association, which has been working to standardize minimal qualifications for training organizations, implemented its National Accreditation for Medical Interpreting Training Program in 2007. This session will explore the national measurable benchmarks developed by interpreter trainers for interpreter trainers.


MED-10 The California Healthcare Interpreting Association Standards
Rosanna Balistreri
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

The California Healthcare Interpreting Standards were created in 2002 and provide clearly defined expectations of how health care interpreters should do their work. The standards also serve as the basis for training, assessment, and job expectations. This session will give participants a solid introduction to the ethical principles that help health care interpreters navigate common dilemmas. The session will also provides protocols to explain what to do before, during, and after an interpreted session, as well as guidelines on how you can change roles while interpreting to overcome barriers to communication.


Medical T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-K Simultaneous Interpreting: Mission (NOT!) Impossible for Medical and Community Interpreters

SEM-N Translating Clinical Trial Protocols (English>Spanish)

G-2 Milestones in DNA Sequencing Technologies and Genome Analysis

I-9 The Challenges of Interpreting for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Medical and Legal Settings

I-11 Health Care Interpreting Roles for a New Millennium

K-7 Introduction to Acupuncture and Asian Medicine

K-8 Understanding Oriental Medicine Treatment

LAW-5 Essential Anatomy and Physiology for Judiciary Interpreters

SL-7 Autopsy Reports in Polish and English: Translation, Terminology, and Style

ST-5 DNA Translation: It's All in the Genes

ST-6 Basic Concepts of Pharmacology in Drug Development

ST-7 Drugs of Abuse: A Pharmacological Perspective

T-2 Anatomy of a Multilingual Style Guide

Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 Translating for the Design and Construction Professions in Israel
Don Jacobson
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Israel has recently undergone far-reaching changes in large-scale infrastructure and commercial construction projects. Foreign investment and professional partnering play a growing role in the Israeli economy, while Israeli developers and engineering firms increase their activities abroad. This activity has brought with it the need for high-quality technical translation in order to facilitate communication among partners, enable new players to enter the economy, and improve local technical capacity in fields previously absent in Israel. This session will cover the wide range of activities covered by this field of translation and the special challenges translators face.


ST-2 CANCELLED
Photovoltaic Technology and Architectural Aspects of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics
Silke Krawietz
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




ST-3 CANCELLED
Energy Efficiency: A Basic Overview of the Way to Sustainable Buildings with Building-Integrated Photovoltaics
Silke Krawietz
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




ST-4 An Introduction to Aviation and Air Travel
Nicholas Hartmann
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This extensively illustrated session will offer an overview of aviation and aeronautics. After an introduction to the Earth's atmosphere and the fundamentals of powered flight, the speaker will discuss contemporary commercial aircraft and their engines, as well as the physical and organizational infrastructure of the international air travel system. The objective is to give participants a better understanding of how the system works and explain some of what the observant traveler might see at an airport or from an airplane window.


ST-5 DNA Translation: It's All in the Genes
Leo van Zanten
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will provide insight on something we all share, DNA. It will cover various aspects of genetics, including mutations, breeding, biotechnology, gene therapy, and gene translation. The different applications of DNA technology in plants and animals and recent advances will also be discussed. Some resources will be provided.


ST-6 Basic Concepts of Pharmacology in Drug Development
Bob Lyon
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This session will introduce the basic pharmacological concepts of drug action, including receptors and receptor interaction, receptor occupancy and drug action, agonists and antagonists, and the relationship between drug efficacy and potency. Illustrative examples will be provided for each concept as well as how the aspects of drug behavior are measured or assessed in the laboratory or clinical settings.


ST-7 Drugs of Abuse: A Pharmacological Perspective
Bob Lyon
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This session will provide a pharmacological perspective on drugs of abuse (including nicotine, caffeine, and alcohol). Abused drugs actually have a wide range of different pharmacological actions and mechanisms. Included in this session will be an extensive overview of how different drug types are regulated or scheduled based upon their potential for abuse. This session will help make the science of pharmacology real and tangible even to the non-specialist.


ST-8 CANCELLED
From the Catwalk to CAT Tools: Translating for the Fashion and Garment Industry
Erin M. Lyons
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




ST-9 Let's Talk Trash!
Abigail L. Dahlberg
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As the world starts to run short on raw material and energy costs spiral higher, industry and policymakers are looking increasingly at waste to bridge the gap. This session will touch upon all of the major waste management technologies, from landfills to incineration and mechanical-biological treatment to composting and recycling. It will also cover some gray areas. When does a product become a waste, and when does a recycled waste become a secondary raw material? This session will also draw comparisons between the approaches taken in the U.S., Europe, and a developing country.


ST-10 The "God Particle," Dark Matter, Black Holes, and All That
Carola F. Berger
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Large Hadron Collider at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) is not only the world's largest machine (and fridge), but also home of the world's largest international scientific collaborations, with scientists from over 100 different nations. As such, the underlying science may be of interest to linguists. The speaker will provide a basic overview on the search for the Higgs (also known as the "God particle"), dark matter, and all the other related buzzwords. Participants will also receive an update on the latest experimental results. Although this session is intended for a non-expert audience, it should be interesting to physics-experts as well.


ST-11 Science and Technology Division Annual Meeting
Karen M. Tkaczyk
(Saturday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

We will review the division's activities and discuss future plans. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


ST-12 Caution: Graphic Images/Explicit Views
Stephanie D. Strobel and Joao Roque Dias
(Saturday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Sections? Scales? Views? Exploded Views? Elevations? Plans? First and third angle projections? Do you know what these terms mean? Let's examine interpreting the hieroglyphics of technical drawings. This session will introduce translators to technical drawings that can provide a Rosetta Stone for a technical translation. We will look at photos of actual equipment and their corresponding representation in drawings. Symbols, views, and terminology within a technical drawing will be explained. Properly reading a technical drawing can boost and improve your translation work.


ST-13 Tequila: Origins, Production, and Quality Control Analysis
Salvador R. Virgen and Mario Aguilar-Briano
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Tequila is one of the drinks known as spirits, a group that includes cognac, whisky, and vodka. This session will describe the origins, the production steps of tequila, and the laboratory techniques used to assure it meets the statutory specifications. This session is geared to translators who want to know about tequila production or analytical chemistry. While it will focus on tequila, much of the material can be applied directly to other spirits or the laboratory methods for other products.


ST-14 NEW SESSION
Instrumental Chemistry: Understanding the Lingo and Underlying Technology
Salvador R. Virgen
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

In many cases, the sciences borrow words from other fields or everyday language and use them with new meanings. As a result, the lingo spoken by practitioners is often unfathomable or misleading to laypeople. This session will focus on the specialized terms used in chromatography and spectroscopy, including a general description of the technology, its uses, and limitations. Special attention will be given to understanding analytical procedures. While this session is no substitute for a full college course in analytical chemistry, it can help participants get a better grasp of analytical chemistry documents such as methods and specifications.


Science & Technology
Related Sessions

C-7 Better Technical Translation and Interpreting: Practical Research Techniques

F-6 Quality Control of Patent Abstract Translation into French at the World Intellectual Property Organization

G-2 Milestones in DNA Sequencing Technologies and Genome Analysis

IT-8 Insights in Technical Translations into Italian

J-2 Terminology-Focused Basic Chemistry (in Japanese)

K-1 Patent Translation: Korean>English

LAW-1 Writing About Patents

MED-1 Basics of Immunology

MED-6 Understanding the Science Behind the Clinical Trials You Translate

MED-7 Interplay of Basic Scientific Research and Human Genetics Studies: A Guide to Understanding and Deciphering Inherited Disorders

P-1 Chemistrese for Dummies

S-8 Best Practices for Spanish Technical Writing

Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

T-1 Revision: Someone Has to Do It, but Why Me?
Jonathan T. Hine
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Every professional translation deserves to be checked by a second translator before delivery. This is called revision. Only an experienced translator can do this job, but many translators will not take revision assignments. Teachers or certification exam graders may seem suited to the work, but professional revision is not the same as grading papers or exams. The speaker, an experienced reviser, will define revision and contrast it with activities that look like it but are not. The session will include pointers on how to approach the revision task and how to price it.


T-2 Anatomy of a Multilingual Style Guide
Natalia C. Becerra and Miria Vargas
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Have you ever wondered if you should capitalize all of the words in the title of a section or how to punctuate a list? This session will help you understand the process of improving quality through the development of a clear, authoritative, easy-to-use style guide. The speakers will share a case study focusing on the production of a multilingual style guide for translators at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, highlighting and including the obstacles they faced and overcame as well as the unexpected insights. This session is designed to appeal to translators and project managers.


T-3 Transcreation: Recreating a Text for the Target Audience
Percy Balemans
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

We have all heard of advertising campaigns gone wrong because they were not adapted for the target audience, and of slogans which, when translated, turned out to mean something completely different, seriously damaging the brand's reputation. To avoid these mistakes, advertising copy should be transcreated rather than translated to ensure that it is written specifically for the target audience. This session will focus on how transcreation works and how it is different from other areas of specialization.


T-4 File Conditioning for Localization: Saving Time and Money in Multilingual DTP
Stephan Gruben and Carter Chen
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

With 20/20 hindsight, localization professionals often come to the painful realization during the desktop publishing phase that, "This could have been avoided if ..." How can we, with adequate file analysis and conditioning, develop 20/20 foresight instead? This session will provide perspective on the benefits of preparing source files for localization. Price-conscious project managers and desktop publishing professionals will learn about the often-hefty return on investment when this sometimes laborious but crucial task is executed with foresight and discipline. Specific processes and techniques will be introduced that address issues such as encoding, text expansion, consistency, and segmentation.


T-5 Decluttering: Dealing with Formal Constraints in Subtitling
Bianca Bold and Carolina Alfaro de Carvalho
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The greatest challenge faced by those who translate subtitles has to do with space and time constraints. Subtitles are displayed on the screen for the duration of the speech segments they translate and are usually limited to two lines. Because written information takes longer to decode than oral speech and viewers have time to read each subtitle only once, the translation has to be short and straightforward. After providing a brief introduction of the formal constraints, the speaker will help translators develop useful "decluttering" strategies for subtitling. The hands-on, interactive approach will focus on practical example, including an English>English paraphrasing exercise using a video clip.


T-6 Getting More Personal in Software User Interface and Help Features: How to Translate It
Alfred Hellstern, Katerina Gasova, and Carolyn Kollstedt
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The role high-tech devices play in our everyday lives, and the resulting "consumerization of information technology," has only recently started to have an effect on the style and terminology used in software user interface and help features. Windows Phone 7, Windows 8, and the newest version of Office are becoming more personal, using everyday language, simpler terminology, and even colloquial and playful expressions. The speaker will discuss the experience of developing this updated style and the translation strategies involved.


T-7 Localization For iPhone and Other iOS Devices
Dierk Seeburg
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The iPhone is the best selling consumer device ever developed. The iTunes app store is the largest software application marketplace ever created. Over 25 billion apps have been downloaded and sold in over a hundred languages. Would you like to know how to break into the market for localizing these apps? Come and learn about the ins and outs of localizing apps for Internetwork Operating System devices like the iPhone and iPad. Practical examples will provide insight into technical and other aspects of this niche to get you started.


T-8 Going Graphic
Michael R. Cardenas and Patrick Hofmann
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Most companies that create content to be localized have a common goal: make sure the product ships in all of the required languages on time and that it meets the budget requirements. Whether or not the localized languages are easy to understand and the instructions are clear is secondary. Writers are starting to replace text with graphics. Learn how a pioneer in localization has ventured into this "graphics" strategy and how they received buy-in from management in order to go graphic. The speaker will discuss the use of white space, simple text format, the selection of graphics, as well as other strategies he has implemented.


T-9 Global English (Globish) and Its Impact on the Translator
Jeana M. Clark and Esma Gregor
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As language professionals, we often have to translate or edit documents from or into English that are influenced by Global English (coined "Globish" by Madhukar Gogate and subsequently trademarked by Jean-Paul Nerriere). Globish is a simplified form of English used by non-native English speakers worldwide. Since translators must deal with this phenomenon more frequently, we will present an introduction into the development of global languages, their function and use, real-life examples, subsequent problems the translator may face, and possible strategies for dealing with them effectively.


T-10 Archaeological Translation
Nazila Khalkhali
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Today, in an age of rapid modernization, the past is taking on a more focused, modern significance as a source of political symbols and ideals. The speaker will show how archaeological translation is inherent to the socio-political identity of Iranians. Written in forgotten or dead languages, the scripts are considered the keys that open the doors to the fascinating world of the Iranian antiquity.


T-11 How to Be an Outstanding Diplomatic Translator
Joseph P. Mazza
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The State Department's Office of Language Services has been recruiting and training diplomatic translators since 1781. What qualities and skills does it look for in its translators? What skills does it help its translators develop? What role does translation technology now play? To answer these questions, the chief of the State Department's Translating Division will share anecdotes gleaned from nearly three decades of work with staff and contract translators. He will also share examples of real-life challenges in diplomatic translation and discuss with participants how they were resolved.


T-12 Picture-Perfect Translations: Methods for Fixing (and Finding!) Issues in Romance Language>English Translations
Robert E. Sette
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Languages within the same family share many common etymological and structural roots. This can allow mistranslations to creep into our work, bedeviling even experienced translators. This session will explore issues involving words and structures in Romance languages and offer concrete tips and methods for not only fixing these translation errors, but also for realizing situations where they typically occur. Particular emphasis will be given to source-language examples from Spanish, French, and Portuguese, though some relevant Italian and Catalan examples may be used. Translators of all Romance languages into English will likely benefit from this session.


Translation
Related Sessions

LT-5 Subtitling Motion Pictures: Techniques and Technologies

Translation & Interpreting Professions
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TIP-1 Lightning Talks: The Future of Translation and Interpreting
Karen M. Tkaczyk
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session marks the beginning of the special series: the future of translation and interpreting. Eight people, representing different views on the translation and interpreting industry, will give "lightning" presentations. Each panelist will give a personal perspective lasting four minutes. Time limits will be strictly enforced. This session is designed to present challenging opinions in a high-energy way and to stimulate discussion on big-picture issues throughout the entire conference.


TIP-2 Using ASTM and ISO Translation and Interpreting Standards
Beatriz A. Bonnet, Alan Melby, and Marjory Bancroft
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The ASTM F2575 Guide for Quality Assurance in Translation and ASTM F2089 Guide for Language Interpretation Services outline best practices in the language industry. They serve not only as guides for language services providers, but also as a means for integrating the client effectively into the specification of products and services. This session will discuss how translators, interpreters, project managers, company owners, and government agencies can use these and similar standards to build effective client relationships and ensure the quality of their work.


TIP-3 New Developments in National and International Standards for Translation and Interpreting
William P. Rivers, Sue Ellen Wright, Jiri Stejskal , and Carola Green
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ASTM Committee F43 on Language Services and Products was established in 2010 to assist in the development of standards for language services and products. The speakers will describe F43, ATA's role, and the work currently underway to develop standards for translation and interpreting. The role ASTM F43 plays in representing the interests of the U.S. to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) will also be addressed.


TIP-4 Translators in the Media: Visibility Among the General Public
Mirna Soares Andrade
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am to Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm

An increasing number of news stories related to translation can now be found in the general media. From a position of almost invisibility, the activity seems to be making its way to television shows, newspapers, and documentaries. Linguists have become an object of attention, which has contributed to recognition as well as stereotype. The speaker will discuss how translators are (mis)represented by the media, based on recently published and broadcast material. The important implications of this social representation and translators' and interpreters' influence over their public image will also be addressed.


TIP-5 Endless Possibilities Talks
Esther M. Navarro-Hall and Gerda Prato-Espejo
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Why should interpreters and translators embrace video conferencing ("hangout") technology on Google+? The Endless Possibilities Talks initiative was launched to encourage the free flow of information among language professionals. We meet in hangouts of up to ten people and we share our experiences. We also record and stream the hangouts live on the Internet, or we stream to specific groups ("circles"), depending on the topic and the sensitivity of the information. The videos are posted widely as a means of making this information available to our practicing colleagues, as well as to the new generation of language professionals.


TIP-6 The Debate: The Future of Translation and Interpreting
Laurie M. Gerber
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Jost Zetzsche has been replaced by Laurie M. Gerber

This panel debate is the conclusion of the special series: the future of translation and interpreting. It will feature three speakers: a translator who chooses a relatively low-tech approach to his work, a representative of the machine translation community, and an interpreter. The speakers will be given 10 to 15 minutes to argue their opinions on the future of our profession. They will be encouraged to take the comments made by conference attendees during the "Comment Capture" portion of this series into account. This will be followed up with questions from the audience.


Translation & Interpreting Professions
Related Sessions

SL-1 Slavic Languages Division Roundtable: Translation versus Interpreting

Training and Pedagogy
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TP-1 Translating and Subtitling the Stars
Jeffrey K. Longwell
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

This session will review the experience and processes involved in service-learning projects that were part of advanced technical translation courses at New Mexico State University (NMSU). Topics will include establishing relationships with community organizations and collaborating with field experts, finding terminology sources, and using software for subtitling. The projects discussed will include the translation of exhibit and outreach material for the National Solar Observatory at Sunspot, New Mexico, subtitling educational videos for the Astronomy Department at NMSU, and subtitling videos for use in the visitor's center at the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico.


TP-2 Internships in Translation and Localization Management: A Panel for Students and Host Companies
Dary R. Hague, Jeffrey Wood, and Sue Ellen Wright
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Matching translation and localization management students eager for internships with potential host companies is a perennial challenge for students, employers, and trainers. In this session, a panel of trainers from various translator training programs will discuss the benefits of on-the-job training programs. Topics will include student remuneration, duties, active mentoring, and support for general living/travel arrangements. Issues involving visas, including the U.S. government's F-1 Visa Curricular Practical Training requirements, will also be addressed.


TP-3 Teaching Translation Studies Students How Machine Translation Works
Elizabeth Lowe McCoy, Patricia Phillips-Batoma, Leonardo Giannossa, Kirti Vashee, and Mike Dillinger
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The use of machine translation (MT) tools should be integrated into a well-rounded translation studies curriculum, along with computer-assisted translation tools. However, in order to use such tools effectively, translation students need to understand how they work "under the hood." But information on the codes and algorithms driving these tools is hard to come by due to the proprietary nature of these products. This session will bring together a group of specialists who interact with MT in various ways to discuss how best to teach students how this software operates and how translators will be interacting with these tools in the future.


TP-4 CANCELLED
Teaching Computer-Assisted Translation in the 21st Century
Uwe Muegge
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




TP-5 CANCELLED
Intersections of Theory and Practice: Translation Studies in the Classroom
Ben Van Wyke, Rosemary Arrojo, Brian Baer, and Claudia Angelelli
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




TP-6 Language Coaching Skills
Melida Fernendez-Gomez and Florangel Lopez
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss the role of the language coach and the importance of feedback. Topics will include the challenges encountered when delivering feedback and helpful techniques to ensure a successful feedback session.


Terminology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TRM-1 Gangs and Guns
Julie Rexwinkel
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will serve as an introduction to terminology and information regarding gangs, segregation, guns, and other weapons that are commonly used in state prison systems. It is necessary for interpreters and translators working in the legal system to be familiar with this specialized jargon. Participants will engage in exercises to develop their vocabulary skills.


TRM-2 Enlarge Your Territory: Self-Training in New Areas of Expertise

(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Today more than ever before, lifelong learning is an essential element to the translator's professional path. However, training is not always available for specific fields or for less commonly used working languages. The speaker will discuss a language-pair-independent corpora-based approach that will allow attendees to teach themselves terminology and phraseology in their source and target languages.


TRM-3 CANCELLED
Crowdsourcing Large and Complex Lists: Company Names
Thomas Ennis Fennell
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




TRM-4 CANCELLED
Best Practices in Terminology Work
Sue Ellen Wright, Barbara Inge Karsch, and Mark Childress
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




Terminology
Related Sessions

SEM-C Managing, Importing, and Exporting Bilingual Glossaries with UniLex

SEM-J Terminology Management for Translation Environments

LSC-1 How to Bring Terminology Management to Center Stage: Case Studies of How It Can Make or Break a Project

Varia
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

V-1 Toward Better Translation and Interpreting Services in the K-12 Setting
Monica M. Villalobos and Eva Sakkis
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

This session will focus on the expansion of translation and interpreting services in the K-12 setting. Topics will include an explanation of the different roles translators and interpreters have in school districts, the importance of qualified staff, the steps for delivering professional interpreting/translation, and the practical resources and techniques for delivering quality services. Ethics will also be discussed. We will review a more fluid process to avoid grammatical, spelling, and syntactical errors, with examples in Spanish. We will also examine a more culturally friendly way to create translations and interpret for special education meetings.




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