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Sessions by Specialization
Select a specialization below to see the sessions offered:

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ATA ATA Activities I Interpreting
IC Independent Contractors L Literary Translation
LAW Legal T&I LT Language Technology
MED Medical T&I ST Science & Technology
TIP Translation & Interpreting Professions TP Training and Pedagogy
TRM Terminology V Varia

TIP: This new Session Code has been given to sessions that explore developments affecting the Translating and Interpreting Professions as a whole.



ATA Activities
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ATA-1 Opening Session
Nicholas Hartmann and Dorothee Racette
(Thursday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Start the conference off right by attending the Opening Session!


ATA-2 Presentation of Candidates and Election
Nicholas Hartmann
(Thursday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Hear the candidates for ATA's Board of Directors voice their opinions and then make them hear yours by exercising the right to vote. You must be an Active or Corresponding member of ATA to vote.


ATA-3 Preparing to Take ATA's Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Geoffrey S. Koby
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

CHANGE
NEW: Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm
OLD: Thursday, 11:30am-12:00pm

This forum will be of interest to ATA members who seek a better understanding of ATA's Certification Exam. The presenter will respond to questions from the audience about certification policies and procedures, as well as how to prepare to take the exam.


ATA-4 Orientation for First-Time Attendees
Jill R. Sommer and Ted R. Wozniak
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Is this your first time attending ATA's Annual Conference? Don't be shy—we'd love to meet you! The presenters will provide tips to help you get the most out of the conference and answer your questions. And it's a great opportunity to network with other first-time attendees from around the country and around the world!


ATA-5 Recharging Your Chapter: Brainstorming Together
Caitilin Walsh
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Is your regional group struggling with a particular issue? Do you have an inspiring success story or great idea to share, or do you just want to hear what others are doing? Join other chapter, affiliate, and group leaders to share best practices and learn tips and tricks. The presenter strongly encourages every chapter and affiliate to send a representative. All are welcome.


ATA-6 Annual Meeting of All Members
Nicholas Hartmann
(Friday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Find out what your association has accomplished and the goals that are being set. Members of the audience will be given an opportunity to ask questions and make comments to ATA Board members and committee chairs.


ATA-7 Grader Recruitment for ATA's Certification Program
Geoffrey S. Koby
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

ATA's Certification Program is always looking to refresh its grading pool. If you are ATA-certified and have the time to devote to furthering the goals of the program, you might be a good candidate to join one of our grader workgroups. Come learn more about the responsibilities and benefits of being a part of this group of professionals.


ATA-8 Keyboarded Certification Exam: History and Status
Alan K. Melby and Geoffrey S. Koby
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ATA certification exams are currently taken using paper and pencil. It has long been recognized that most candidates would prefer to take the exam using a computer keyboard, and some have wondered why we do not simply invite candidates to type their translation on a computer and e-mail it to ATA Headquarters. This session will describe the history of the keyboarded exam project (known as CertSoft), including the various security constraints that preclude a simple solution. It will also report on the current status of the project. Questions from attendees will be invited at session end.


ATA-9 Workshop on the ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice
Caitilin Walsh
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

While codes of ethics sometimes appear dry and boring as written, applying them in real life can create interesting and juicy dilemmas. We will see how the new ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice applies to real-life situations while we look at some of the gray areas of professional conduct in translation and interpreting. This workshop fulfills the ethics requirement for maintaining ATA certification.


ATA-10 "Boot Camp" for Newly-Elected Division Administrators and Assistant Division Administrators
Boris M. Silversteyn
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; By Invitation Only; Presented in: English)

This session will give newly-elected division administrators and assistant division administrators a chance to discuss their future responsibilities. We will illustrate a typical year as administrators, including what happens, when, and how, recruiting and working with volunteers, coordinating the newsletters, blogs, and websites, delegating tasks within the division, mediating conflicts, communications and governing policy, and what to do when problems arise.


ATA-11 Standards, Part I
Sue Ellen Wright, William P. Rivers, and Beatriz A. Bonnet
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The $15-billion language services industry has come together under the aegis of ASTM International to establish Main Committee ASTM F43, "Language Services and Products," to address the need for consensus-based industry standards to meet the requirements of the rapidly expanding language industry. National associations, companies, and government agencies active in translating, interpreting, language training, machine translation, human language technology, and language testing met in February to establish ASTM F43. This session will provide an overview of ASTM F43, the role of ATA, and the translation- and interpreting-related standards being developed by the International Organization for Standardization.


ATA-12 Standards, Part II
Sue Ellen Wright, Richard D. Brecht, and Glenn H. Nordin
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ASTM Main Committee F43, "Language Services and Products," has been established by representatives from all sectors of the language services industry to develop national and international standards. Government and commercial buyers work with providers and academic experts to develop these standards. This session will present the government and commercial perspectives on the work of ASTM F43. The national role ASTM F43 plays in expanding the $15-billion language industry while improving national security and economic competitiveness will also be discussed.


ATA Activities
Related Sessions

C-5 Chinese Language Division Annual Meeting

F-3 French Language Division Annual Meeting

G-2 Taking ATA's English>German Certification Exam, Part I: Understanding the Principles and Their Impact on Strategy and Grading

G-3 Taking ATA's English>German Certification Exam, Part II: Strategies for Success

G-9 German Language Division Annual Meeting

IT-2 Italian Language Division Annual Meeting

J-6 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop

J-7 Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting

K-3 Korean Language Division Annual Meeting

L-6 Literary Division Annual Meeting

LSP-3 Translation Company Division Annual Meeting

LT-8 Language Technology Division Annual Meeting

MED-6 Medical Division Annual Meeting

P-3 Portuguese Language Division Annual Meeting

S-11 Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting

SL-4 Slavic Languages Division Annual Meeting

ST-11 Science and Technology Division Annual Meeting

Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 Myths and Truth: Preparing for the State Court Interpreter Certification Exam
Judy A. Jenner
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

If you are thinking about taking the court interpreter certification exam in one of the 41 states that form part of the Consortium for Language Access for State Courts, then this presentation is for you. The presenter will discuss the many myths and half-truths about this written and oral examination. You will learn about the exam requirements and what you need to know before getting started. Tips on how to prepare will also be given.


I-2 Remote Interpreting/Team Interpreting in the Courtroom
Thelma Ferry and Ody Arias
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Remote interpreting allows the courts to use technological solutions to provide mandated services while expanding their use of interpreters. Remote interpreting also lets interpreters increase their scope of coverage while providing quality services within the infrastructure of the courtroom. Team interpreting allows interpreters to provide effective communication, thus helping to achieve accuracy, quality, and uniformity. Team interpreting prevents burnout and fatigue, ensuring adherence to judicial guidelines. The degree of trust placed on interpreters and the magnitude of this responsibility requires strict compliance to ethical standards. The advantages and pitfalls associated with remote interpreting and team interpreting will be discussed.


I-3 Note-Taking for Dialogue Interpreting Settings: Adapting Long-Consecutive Techniques for Medical, Community, Business, and Other Arenas
Katharine Allen
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Note-taking skills are not just for conference and legal interpreters practicing the long consecutive mode. The appropriate use of notes can greatly enhance an interpreter's performance in dialogue interpreting. The trick is learning when and how to take notes to facilitate better communication. This presentation will cover the proper role and purpose of note-taking in short dialogue interpreting and teach participants how to incorporate this skill into daily interpreting assignments. Topics will include: 1) exercises for improving memory and active listening skills; 2) how to structure notes; 3) symbols and how to use them; and 4) when and what to take notes on.


I-4 Interpreters Division Annual Meeting
Thelma Ferry
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Interpreters Division administrative officers will discuss the annual report summarizing the 2011 year-in-review activities, discuss issues of interest with the membership, outline the plans, goals, and objectives for 2012, and future collaborative efforts for the advancement of the profession. The annual meeting offers members an opportunity to meet colleagues, share insights, voice opinions, make suggestions, and become involved. We invite all ID members, nonmembers, and conference attendees to attend.


I-5 Impact of Processing Discourse in Conference Interpreting
Georganne Weller
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Processing discourse is basic to the interpreter's role in facilitating communication between speakers and listeners without a common language. It requires great mental effort during the comprehension phase and during the production phase to reproduce a cohesive and accurate message. The presenter will provide an example of an interpreter's approach to the same political speech, rendered in both the consecutive and simultaneous modes. The presenter will analyze the interpreter's different levels of involvement and how his or her active participation in the communication process facilitates or impedes communication between the speaker and the end user.


I-6 Uncharted Training Territory: Reaching Interpreters in the Field
Barbara Moser-Mercer
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Conflict and natural disasters know no linguistic boundaries. Ending a conflict and delivering emergency and humanitarian aid across language barriers represents a major challenge for which few humanitarian organizations are well equipped to handle. There is a chronic shortage of interpreters in zones of crisis with the proper training. This presentation will describe pedagogical approaches to training interpreters in the field with the use of virtual learning environments accessible on mobile devices in conflict zones. It will propose innovative ways of developing virtual communities of practice that will provide interpreters in the field with ongoing opportunities for professional and personal growth.


I-7 Court Interpreting and Ethics
Yvette Hovsepian Bearce
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will review professional and ethical responsibilities for court interpreters and discuss some of the most common and difficult situations that arise while interpreting for non-English-speaking individuals. This presentation will be of use to interpreters at all levels, including advanced interpreters. Beginner interpreters will learn how to integrate themselves into the team of court officers and follow the specific guidelines set for official court interpreters. Interpreters will also learn how ethical guidelines for interpreters in other states may differ slightly from those set by their own states, and how to seek out this information prior to appearing for the assignment.


I-8 National Certification for Health Care Interpreters: A Panel Discussion
Thelma Ferry, Elena Langdon Fortier, Mara Youdelman, Enrica J. Ardemagni, and Andy Benzo
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Three nationally recognized organizations will convene in this panel presentation about certification of medical interpreters. The goals will be to address the accomplishments of the national certification for health care interpreters related to the certification process and standards of practice in support of delivering quality services to diverse populations. The panelists will provide information about the importance and professionalization of health care interpreters.


I-9 Consecutive Interpreting: Skill-Building Techniques for Beginners
Gurmail Gill
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This presentation will enable beginners from all language combinations to gain interpreting and subject matter preparation skills through hands-on practice. Special focus will be given to listening and comprehension, memory retention, platform skills, learning techniques, and self-assessment. Participants will review the different modes of interpreting and use different techniques to enhance their consecutive interpreting skills. Self-assessment exercises will help participants map out their strengths and weaknesses for further professional development.


I-10 "Do You Think My Patient's Crazy?" How to Handle the Zingers in Community, Medical, or Legal Interpreting
Marjory A. Bancroft
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

It happens every day: you hit roadblocks to communication. Maybe it is a legal phrase you did not understand. That's easy. Request clarification. Maybe the situation is more challenging: the client has no idea what is going on, the doctor talks PhD English, or the client describes horrific torture. Maybe the attorney asks you in front of the client, "Do you think he's lying?" or the forensic nurse does not understand the rape victim is suicidal—but you do. You are stuck in the middle. What are you allowed to say and do? This presentation will give concrete, practical guidance about how to address barriers to communication.


I-11 CANCELLED
The Challenges Interpreting for Official Foreign Visitors
Michelle F. Cohen
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




I-12 Lights, Camera, Action: Over-the-Phone and Webcast Interpreting
Cristina Silva
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Technology has made it possible to interpret consecutively over-the-phone and simultaneously and remotely during webcasts. The presenter will discuss her experiences interpreting over-the-phone and in remote webcast events. Topics will include ideal interpreter profiles, minimum setup, as well as challenges and difficulties and how to overcome them. This presentation will also share secrets from the field by featuring interviews with interpreting project coordinators as well as over-the-phone and webcast interpreters.


I-13 Cognitive Theory of Simultaneous Interpreting and Training
Erik Camayd-Freixas
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




I-14 Interpreting: A Lifelong Learning Process
Enrica J. Ardemagni and Joy Connell
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreter education and training revolves around curricula and the hours required to meet acceptable performance. The National Council on Interpreting in Health Care has researched the minimum requirements needed to ensure that interpreters can do their jobs with the necessary level of proficiency. One component many programs omit is that, just like any profession, interpreters must continually make efforts to keep their skills and knowledge base current. This presentation will focus on the concept of lifelong learning and offer examples on how interpreters can apply specific strategies to stay on top of their performance.


I-15 NEW SESSION
I Am an Interpreter: Forging a Nationally Recognized Professional Identity
Katharine Allen and Barry S. Olsen
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Last June, leaders from community, conference, legal, medical, military, and signed language interpreting created a template for action for our profession during the Professional Identity Workgroup Sessions, held at the 2nd North American Summit on Interpreting in Washington, DC. The sessions sought areas of consensus and recommendations for key issues facing the entire profession: professional associations, education/training, legal/advocacy, certification/credentialing, and technology, which were subsequently published in a publicly-available White Paper. This session will cover the highlights from this call to action as well as other key developments and next steps resulting from the Summit.


Interpreting
Related Sessions

SEM-B Brazil and Portugal: Two Countries Separated by a Common Language

SEM-F Building Blocks in Interpreter Training

SEM-M Equal Access to Justice Requires Equal Language Access in the Courtroom

C-2 Exploring Chinese-English Interpreting Techniques

IC-8 Interpreter Freelancing 101: How to Work with Agencies

J-4 A Good Interpreting Gig: Opening Japan in 1853

J-8 Automotive/Manufacturing Interpreting

P-7 Why Can't We Understand Each Other If We Speak the Same Language?

Independent Contractors
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

IC-1 Business Strategies for Independent Professionals
Estela A. Chemen
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Participants will acquire the skills and learn the secrets to excel as professionals in their fields of expertise, sell themselves and their services, make an impact on others, and solve professional problems. Topics will include: presentation and public speaking; creative tools for effective meetings; conflict resolution approaches; creative cooperation; synergy; self-renewal; time and task management; and building long-lasting relationships and communicating effectively. William Ury's best-selling ideas for negotiating successfully will also be included in the discussion.


IC-2 Online Reputation Management
Marcela Jenney
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Google, besides being the leading Internet search engine, is today the main source of personal and professional information. When your prospects, clients, and leads are interested in you or your business, they use Google to check you out. Professionals, business owners, and those who are concerned about their professional success must be cognizant of their online reputation. Decisions are being made about you based on the information found online. Taking control of your digital identity is a key ingredient in achieving professional success. This presentation will show you all what you need to know to manage your online reputation.


IC-3 Working Successfully with a Translation Partner
Corinne McKay and Eve Bodeux
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Working with a partner is a great way to boost your business and your confidence. Partners can edit each other's translations and split large projects in order to offer their clients faster turnaround and two pairs of eyes on every translation. Partners can improve their businesses and expand their services beyond translation. Drawing from nearly a decade of experience working together as translators, editors, and translation industry trainers, the presenters will offer practical tips for working (harmoniously!) with a partner. The focus will be on how to benefit from working with a partner without the constraints of forming a joint business entity.


IC-4 CANCELLED
Doing Great by Doing Good: Working with the Nonprofit Sector
Omar Postigo-Martell
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




IC-5 Making the Whole More Than the Sum of Its Parts: Cooperation in Virtual Translator Work Groups
Friderike A. Butler and Jeana M. Clark
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will be particularly useful for freelance translators who are interested in energizing their business through virtual partnerships. The presenters will summarize the high and low lights of working as a freelance translator and provide compelling reasons for forming formal as well as informal partnerships with other translators working in the same or different language pair(s). Topics will include proper etiquette for virtual work groups, goal-setting, effective marketing, tools and technology to support virtual work groups, and challenges. Questions will be taken at the end.


IC-6
Virginia Hinders and Christiane Fine
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




IC-7 The Entrepreneurial Linguist: Lessons from Business School
Judy A. Jenner
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Linguists excel in the humanities, but most have little business training. This presentation will show linguists how to behave like entrepreneurs. This interactive workshop revolves around working with direct clients and focuses on marketing (to direct clients, Web 2.0, competitive advantage), and includes sections on economics (pricing, supply, and demand), accounting (cutting expenses), entrepreneurship (generating new business, networking), and negotiating. True to the case study method from business school, many real-life examples and discussion starters will be included. No high-level terminology will be used. Participants will walk away from this presentation with specific advice that they can start using immediately.


IC-8 CANCELLED
Interpreter Freelancing 101: How to Work with Agencies

(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)




IC-9 Win-Win: How to Set a Fair Price for Your Work
Jonathan T. Hine
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators and interpreters are in business. Pricing and monitoring financial performance are crucial to business success. This presentation will cover the elements of budgeting and business planning. The methodology will help participants develop personal criteria for accepting or rejecting freelance assignments, balancing employment offers, and choosing alternatives for business expansion. The presentation will cover calculating the break-even price and tracking sales volume and revenue. New material on evaluating life-changing moves, selling quality to clients, building operating reserves, and surviving business cycles will also be included.


IC-10 Blogging 101
Riccardo Schiaffino and Corinne McKay
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

An interesting blog is a good way to establish a translator's presence online and gain visibility; however, it is essential to plan your blog carefully to attract not only other translators but also clients and prospects. This presentation will deal with the essentials of blogging: what a blog is and what purposes it can serve, how to start a blog, how to plan and write it, how to attract readers, and the various tools and platforms available. The presenters will share their first-hand knowledge, earned through writing two popular blogs on translation.


IC-11 100% Match: How to Deliver the Quality Translation Agencies Want
Rene P. Fassbender and Eugenia A. Tumanova
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Working with Fortune 500 companies and large translation agencies adds a complex layer of quality expectations and procedures to your translation project. The presenters, both industry professionals with years of experience in translation quality management, will discuss the most common quality issues they see in their daily work. They will share best practices that will help translators establish a workflow designed to reduce stress, save time, and deliver high-quality translations that meet the expectations of both agencies and end clients.


IC-12 Smart Business for Translators and Interpreters
Jost O. Zetzsche, Chris Durban, Corinne McKay, Judy A. Jenner, and Francesca Samuel
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The panelists in this discussion forum have business expertise in translation and interpreting. What is the best way to move your business forward? What are the most important steps you can take to boost your income, and how can you take advantage of the growing market? Participants are encouraged to bring questions of their own.


IC-13 NEW SESSION
An Inside Look: What Agencies Really Want from Translators
Maureen Garelick
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will review how freelance translators can find, develop, and maintain mutually satisfactory relationships with language services agencies. We will discuss what agencies and freelancers expect from each other and how freelancers can effectively position and market themselves to an agency. Freelancers have ideas about what agencies want, but not all of these perceptions are accurate. We will review some of the myths about agency motives and address how agencies approach the following: recruiting according to subject matter and project types; quality translations and fit-for-purpose; project/quality feedback; and setting and negotiating rates.


Independent Contractors
Related Sessions

SEM-A Ramping Up Your Translation Business

SEM-H Maximizing Your Translation Business by Developing a Strong Brand

F-6 Translating for Quebec

LAW-7 How to Get Sponsored for a Government Security Clearance and Land a Job in Forensic Transcription/Translation

LSP-6 10 Essential Steps to Prepare a Document for Translation

LT-4 Information Security for the Freelance Translator

MED-8 How to Stand Out as a Medical Interpreter: Beyond Core Competencies

SL-5 How Virtual Networking Is Changing the Mentality of Russian Freelancers: A Case Study

ST-9 A Dilemma for Language Services Providers and Translators: Subject Matter Expertise and Internet Style

Literary Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 Translators and Authors in the New Publishing Industry
Carsten Peters
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

While most people think that traditional publishing is dying and self-publishing has taken over, the fact is that traditional publishing is redefined itself and self-publishing is maturing. What does that mean for literary translators? In order to define the role of the translator in the new publishing industry, one has to take a closer look at the overall processes, including the roles and the tasks of authors, editors, publishers, and marketers. In regard to literary translation, the presenter will also discuss the roles and tasks of authors, translators, proofreaders, publishers, and marketers.


L-2 Translating for the Publishing Industry
Attila Piroth
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will give an overview of the various aspects of translating for the publishing industry, including the basic principles of copyright. The speaker will also provide a detailed analysis of the economics and other factors behind the notoriously low rates of the sector. A discussion of the "Fair Book Initiative" will conclude the presentation.


L-3 Programs for the Promotion of Translation
Carsten Peters
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Many organizations in Europe and Latin America offer programs for the promotion of literature in translation. These programs target foreign publishers who are willing to translate and publish books into their local languages. Most publishers, however, lack qualified literary translators to carry out this work. In this presentation, participants will learn about how these programs work and what the main challenges are for translators who take the initiative to offer their literary translation services to foreign publishers.


L-4 Overview of Editing Basics for the Translation Professions
Greer Lleuad
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will give an overview of editing basics, including the differences among proofreading, copyediting, and line editing; levels of editing; common problems with punctuation, grammar, and word usage; common problems with style (e.g., capitalization, numbers); and tips on how to best use The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition. The purpose of this overview is to clarify what an editor does and what the editorial process entails, provide resources for editorial work, and highlight the most common problems editors see in manuscripts.


L-5 Translating Art Songs for Performance: Rachmaninoff's Six Choral Songs
Mark Herman and Ronnie Apter
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenters will discuss their degree of success in placing the right words and vowel colors on the right musical notes when translating Rachmaninoff's "Six Choral Songs" for treble voices and piano, opus 15 (1895). The work sets six Russian poems that vary widely in mood and subject matter. As for any translation to pre-existing music, the translators also needed to match syllable counts, verbal stresses, verbal burdens, and, often, rhymes. But all was made more difficult by the compressed song form, which unlike an opera, usually does not allow the shifting of thoughts from one line or stanza to another.


L-6 Literary Division Annual Meeting
Enrica J. Ardemagni
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Literary Division Annual Meeting will focus on a summary of the this year's activities, followed by a discussion of current and future division business. We will introduce the members of the LD Leadership Committee and confirm these members by voting. We will also announcement of the results of the LD elections. Please join us as we plan our activities for 2012.


L-7 CANCELLED
Translations of Eastern Religious Texts: Tradition for Working Translators
D. Bannon
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




Literary Translation
Related Sessions

SEM-I SOLD OUT: Line Editing Skills and Techniques

F-4

F-7 La traduction de la poesie, complexites analytiques et prosodiques

G-12 The China Trilogy: A Bilingual Reading and Discussion

IT-1 Retranslation of Classics for an Authentic Reading Experience

P-10 Topics in Literary Translation

Legal T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 Effective Audio Translation for Courts and Intelligence Communities
Yvette Hovsepian Bearce
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

With the increased demand for experienced translators amongst the intelligence communities, and given the nature of the work, effective and accurate audio translation is a critical task for the translator. This presentation will provide several tools to translators on how to produce high quality and accurate audio translations in less time. Translators will learn about tools that will help them produce court-winning translations. At the same time, managers, supervisors, agents, and those who work with translators will become more educated about this complicated task.


LAW-2 One Judge, One Agency, 10 Linguists, and 10,000 Translated Pages of Protection Orders: A Case Study
Suzana Volquarts, Ida Chen, Yuri V. Balashov, and Janet C. Fasy
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenters will discuss their collaboration on a translation project from three perspectives: the judge who commissioned the project, the translators and editors who worked on the project, and the translation company that managed the project. Participants will gain insight into the challenges and obstacles encountered during the course of the project and learn valuable lessons and practical solutions from all three key players. The focus will be on the challenges of translating court documents such as criminal and civil protection orders into multiple languages.


LAW-3 "ZEN Tensed" by Law
Andy Benzo and Karina A. D Emilio
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

This presentation will provide a holistic approach to the comparison of two criminal sentences, one from the U.S. and one from Argentina. Both sentences will be from a federal judge on a criminal matter. The presenters will give an overview of the different stages involved in the proceeding before sentencing in both systems of law. They will also analyze the different parts of a sentence and the legalese in both languages. Participants will receive a glossary of terms.


LAW-4 The End is Near: Translation of Terms Related to Company Dissolution
Naomi J. Sutcliffe de Moraes
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Company dissolution and liquidation are difficult topics to translate without some understanding of the underlying legal principles and processes. The presenter will describe the processes for dissolution, liquidation, bankruptcy, and reorganization, plus translations of relevant terms between English and several European languages. The many situations that lead to dissolution will also be discussed.


LAW-5 Culture and the Color Wheel
Arlene M. Kelly
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Does universal agreement exist about what shades of hair belong to a blond spectrum, or is there a more inclusive idea of "blond?" Does everyone agree on what black hair looks like? This aspect of working with people from varying cultures and ethnic identities rarely receives attention from translators and interpreters. Yet, especially for those working in areas where identification of persons is important, knowledge of conflicting perceptions is vital in order to render an accurate version in another language. The results of a case study provide some surprising answers to these quandaries. These results and suggested solutions will be discussed.


LAW-6 Let's Get REAL!
Andy Benzo
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

A real estate contract is a contract for the purchase/sale, exchange, or other conveyance of real property between the parties. Leasehold estate is actually a rental of real property, such as apartment, and leases (rental contracts) cover such rentals since they typically do not result in recordable deeds. Real estate contracts are typically bilateral contracts and should have requirements specified by contract law in general, and need to be in writing to be enforceable. Participants will learn more about these topics and other real estate terminology during this session.


LAW-7 CANCELLED
How to Get Sponsored for a Government Security Clearance and Land a Job in Forensic Transcription/Translation
Elena G. Rojas
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




Legal T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-E Contractual Law: Main Principles and Specific Terminology

SEM-L Advanced Spanish>English Legal Translation

SEM-M Equal Access to Justice Requires Equal Language Access in the Courtroom

F-5 Mistakes in Legal Translation: What Consequences?

I-1 Myths and Truth: Preparing for the State Court Interpreter Certification Exam

I-2 Remote Interpreting/Team Interpreting in the Courtroom

I-7 Court Interpreting and Ethics

I-10 "Do You Think My Patient's Crazy?" How to Handle the Zingers in Community, Medical, or Legal Interpreting

IT-4 Class Action (Italian Style)

J-2 Japanese Patents: The Good, the Bad, and the Gorgeous

J-3 Free Intellectual Property Translation Resources

K-1 Korean>English Patent Translation Workshop

K-2 Legal Interpreting: Certification and Beyond

P-4 A Primer of the Brazilian Legal System: Laws, Courts, and Appeals

P-5 The Language of International Contracts

S-1 Overview of Intellectual Property Rights

S-2 Translating Extradition Requests Between Mexico and the U.S.

S-3 Pre-judgment Remedies and the "Medidas Cautelares": Similarities and Differences

SL-6 Coping with Challenges of Simultaneous Interpreting into Russian in Courtroom Settings

Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 Using the Internet as Your Office
Ana Luiza Iaria
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will demonstrate how it is possible to work from anywhere in the world. The presenter will discuss her own experience of spending months abroad and how the online tools allowed her to stay in touch with clients. Tools that make this a reality will be presented, together with the latest releases in terms of software and hardware for translators on the go. As technology advances, we have to be able to adapt to increasingly demanding requirements.


LT-2 How to Deal With More Data Than You Can Handle
Jost O. Zetzsche
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

One thing is for sure: there's no shortage of data that could potentially be used as supporting material in translation projects. And the technology to harvest and harness that data is readily available. This presentation will provide practical guidance on what kind of technology can be used to benefit from online and other resources, what guidelines to employ when making choices on where to start and where to stop utilizing third-party data, and how to actually use it profitably in your everyday translation work.


LT-3 Working with Non-Trados Studio Clients/Translators
Tuomas S. Kostiainen
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The completely redesigned Trados Studio 2009 offers several efficient new features. However, its incomplete, backwards compatibility keeps many translators and language services providers (LSPs) from upgrading. Even those translators who upgrade seem to lack the knowledge (or courage) to use Studio with non-Studio clients, so they are just wasting their own resources. This presentation will review various incompatibility scenarios from the perspective of translators and LSPs and offer solutions so that Studio-users can utilize the benefits of Studio features even if their clients/translators still use Trados 2007. The information provided will be useful for current Studio-users and for those who are thinking about upgrading.


LT-4 Information Security for the Freelance Translator
James Phillips
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In a landscape where the technology available to assist the freelance translator changes almost weekly, it can be difficult for freelance translators who translate confidential material to keep track of which activities can be undertaken without endangering confidentiality and which cannot. Is it acceptable to use browser-based computer-assisted translation (CAT) systems such as Google Translator Toolkit? Can you post questions on closed forums such as Facebook groups? When and how should data be encrypted? How will developments such as translation in the cloud and crowd-sourcing affect personal information security? All these questions will be answered and various possible scenarios will be discussed.


LT-5 Machine Translation Post-Editing Techniques
Laurie M. Gerber
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Clients are eager for the next increment of productivity. Translators are curious about machine translation (MT) post-editing as a specialty. As clients and translators explore the limits of productivity with automation, client requests vary from a light revision of well-customized MT output to a complete overhaul of raw output from free online MT systems. This presentation will offer a definition of MT post-editing for translators. Topics include: suggestions on how to educate over-optimistic clients and decline unreasonable requests; levels of post-editing quality for varying client needs; and tips and techniques for systematic, efficient post-editing. Examples from various languages will be included.


LT-6 Do-It-Yourself Machine Translation
and Jose Palomares
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Machine translation (MT) can increase your productivity. The technology represents a huge advance for the industry, but has put increased pressure on freelancers and small- and medium-sized businesses. This presentation will allow participants to use open-source solutions to benefit fully from this technology before it is imposed upon them by bigger players (as previously occurred with translation memories). Strategies for improved MT output (customization, terminology management, automated post-editing through search and replace) will also be discussed.


LT-7 Tool Update Forum
Alan K. Melby
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This year, the Tool Update Forum will consist of a brief update from each tool vendor on the panel. The update will describe what has changed in the vendor's product line since ATA's Annual Conference in 2010. After the updates, there will be a period where the moderator and audience can ask the tool vendor representatives questions. This session is for experienced tool users who want an update concerning a number of tools.


LT-8 Language Technology Division Annual Meeting
Michael Metzger
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This year's meeting agenda will cover the Language Technology Division's election and activities report. The meeting will also provide a panel discussion on translation industry standards. ATA representatives for the three domains of standards will give a brief overview of the purpose, status, and activities for each respective group.


LT-9 Xbench: A Free Tool for Terminology and Quality Assurance
Riccardo Schiaffino
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Xbench is a superb freeware tool to manage your terminology and control the quality of your translation. The presenter will introduce the various features offered by the program and offer suggestions on how you can use it to complement your other translation and terminology tools.


LT-10 Training a Dragon: Using Speech-to-Text to Boost Productivity
Andrew D. Levine
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Speech-to-text software has become remarkably fast and accurate in recent years. Though once used mainly to assist users with limited mobility, current tools have reached the point where they can enter text faster than many translators' ability to type, sometimes with greater error-resistance and ease of use. What are the advantages and disadvantages of this software? This presentation will discuss several tools currently available and their best applications (as well as weaknesses) in the hands of translators looking to boost productivity. The presentation will include live demonstrations of speech-to-text used in computer-assisted translation tool environments.


LT-11 NEW SESSION
Windows, Mac, or Linux? Which is the Best Operating System for Translators?

(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There are several different operating systems (OSs) a translator can use, but which one is the best? Is it the frequently-used Windows, the intuitive Mac, or the independent Linux? This presentation will discuss the relevant advantages and disadvantages of all three OSs for translators.


Language Technology
Related Sessions

SEM-N Machine Translation in Practice

S-10 Should I Use the Translation Memory or the Glossary?

Medical T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 Pharmaceutical Industry, Part I: Drug Discovery in the Laboratory
Edward Zanders
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The discovery and development of new drugs is a highly technical process with its own jargon. Even an experienced translator with a scientific background can have difficulty in understanding this jargon and its correct usage in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. This presentation will cover the products of the drug discovery industry and review some basic chemistry to explain the differences between drug types and the systems used for their nomenclature. Finally, the flow of activity from drug target discovery to preclinical development of drug candidates will be laid out to help clarify such terms as pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.


MED-2 Pharmaceutical Industry, Part II: Clinical Trials and the Regulation of New Drugs
Edward Zanders
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The discovery and development of new drugs is a highly technical process with its own jargon. Even an experienced translator with a scientific background can have difficulty in understanding this jargon and its correct usage in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. This presentation will continue the drug discovery pipeline theme by describing the clinical trials process and the procedures required to obtain marketing authorization. Finally, the organization of the biopharmaceutical industry will be described briefly, followed by a discussion of new trends in drug discovery that may influence the work of translators in the future.


MED-3 A Biologist's Insight into the Development of New Drugs and Medical Devices
Joanne Archambault
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Based on her industry experience and training as a biologist, the presenter will provide information about how biology comes into play during the development of new drugs and medical devices. Topics will include the biocompatibility and sterility of medical devices, along with the measurement of biomarkers and antibodies to evaluate the efficacy and safety of drugs. The information provided will help new and experienced translators better understand the context of the life sciences documents they are translating, thereby increasing the quality of their work.


MED-4 Learning Medical Terminology Through Medical Case Studies
Zarita Araujo-Lane and Richard Lane, MD
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Medical terminology was created as a way to document new medical concepts and describe treatment, physiology, anatomy, diagnoses, procedures, and instruments. As communication in this field evolved, providers, scientists, and others started to not only speak "medicalese," but to write it through medical abbreviations. This presentation will use case studies to provide participants with a technique that explores how prefixes, roots, suffixes, and abbreviations hold the key to unlocking the meanings found in medical terminology.


MED-5 Not Your Mother's Latin: Boning Up on Medical Terminology for Certification
Marjory A. Bancroft and Katharine Allen
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

So you want to get certified in medical interpreting—congratulations! How is your terminology? Both of the national certification exams include medical terminology, so you will need to prepare. This presentation will provides concrete tools, strategies, guidance, "tech support," and—you guessed it—phone apps to help guide you through the labyrinth. And make it fun. (Really.) The trick? Think of medical terminology as a game. Find a partner. And practice. We will show you how.


MED-6 Medical Division Annual Meeting
Patricia M. Thickstun and Suzanne Couture
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Medical Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other medical translators and interpreters. During the division meeting, we will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2012. All division members are encouraged to attend, and non-members are invited to come learn more about the Medical Division.


MED-7 Interpreting for the Third Age of Limited-English-Speaking Patients
Janet M. Erickson-Johnson and Janet E. Bonet
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As the population gets older, limited-English-proficient patients are not exempt from suffering from the ailments typical of those who are in the "third age" of life, that is, senior citizens. The challenges that both families and providers face when dealing with dementia, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other diseases of the elderly provide just as many challenges for interpreters who facilitate communication in health care. The presenters will share not only their professional perspective on this issue, but also their personal experiences with family members at this stage of life. Resources on the subject will also be available.


MED-8 How to Stand Out as a Medical Interpreter: Beyond Core Competencies
Ariel Lenarduzzi
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The current job market demands that medical interpreters adapt to the changing culture of the health care industry. New regulations, federal reforms, and budget restrictions demand creativity and flexibility. Medical interpreters must be willing to look beyond core qualifications and explore strategies that would set them apart from the competition. This presentation will review strategies to help medical interpreters increase their booking potential. Topics include: what employers look for; how to ace an interview; the importance of medical clearance; credentialing; the new Joint Commission culture standards; and the culture of "yes."


MED-9 Mission Critical: Core Competencies for Medical Interpreters on the Front Line
Lena Toolsie and Heather Barclay
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Now, more than ever, medical interpreters are called to the scene when a doctor has to deliver bad news to a patient and family members. A recent qualitative study among professional medical interpreters identified many serious challenges faced in emotionally loaded situations. From the perspective of the administrators behind the scenes and interpreters on the front line, participants will learn key skills in breaking bad news. The focus will be on the medical interpreter's critical role when the patient faces serious illness or emotional trauma.


Medical T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-C The Language of Clinical Research Protocols and Informed Consents

G-4 Translating and Localizing Patient Information: Challenges and Solutions

I-3 Note-Taking for Dialogue Interpreting Settings: Adapting Long-Consecutive Techniques for Medical, Community, Business, and Other Arenas

I-8 National Certification for Health Care Interpreters: A Panel Discussion

I-10 "Do You Think My Patient's Crazy?" How to Handle the Zingers in Community, Medical, or Legal Interpreting

I-14 Interpreting: A Lifelong Learning Process

J-1 A Guide to the Scientific and Medical Fields for Japanese Translators

J-5 Current Topics in the Scientific and Medical Research Fields for Japanese Translators

S-9 Medical Devices: Translation, Localization, and Global Requirements and Standards

Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 Translating Technical Manuals: Dos and Don'ts and Some Best Practices
Joao Roque Dias
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Technical manuals are written for a very precise and specific purpose: to convey information to those who need it to operate a piece of equipment, to keep their jobs, or, simply, enhance their lives. A technical text is not a literary text sprinkled with puzzling words (the so-called technical terms) and complicated sentences. Far from it! With these simple ideas in mind, participants will examine a manual's anatomy, dissect it part-by-part (from the translator's point of view), and study some examples of what to do—and perhaps more importantly, what not to do.


ST-2 Oil and Gas Production and Exploration, Part I
Steven Marzuola
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will provide a brief introduction to oil and gas exploration and production. It will include a summary of early oil discoveries and historical background, the conditions required for the formation of reservoirs of hydrocarbons, seismic prospecting techniques, drilling tools and techniques, downhole and surface completion equipment, the stages of life of an oilfield, and flowlines and pipelines. The presentation will conclude with an introduction to Peak Oil.


ST-3 Oil and Gas Production and Exploration, Part II
Steven Marzuola
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will provide an introduction to oil and gas exploration and production, focusing on offshore and international fields and operations. It will include a description of the major technological developments that enable production of oil and gas from deep-water fields and the technical challenges that must be overcome. The presenter will also discuss historical trends in the industry and the future importance of hydrocarbons in the world energy market.


ST-4 Translating English Technical Texts, Part I
Mathilde Fontanet
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

After a brief introduction on the specifics of technical texts, participants will examine sample texts representative of three difficulties associated with the translation of technical texts from English into other languages. They will be asked to identify these difficulties, define strategies to solve them, discuss priorities, and assess different solutions. This presentation will focus on three difficulties: 1) the lack of implicit knowledge, 2) the micro-relationships between words, and 3) the inability to define "sub-units" (parsing). Methods, principles, and solutions will be compared, discussed, and challenged from the practical perspective of as many target languages as the participants are working with.


ST-5 Translating English Technical Texts, Part II
Mathilde Fontanet
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Participants will examine sample texts representative of four difficulties associated with the translation of technical texts from English into other languages. They will be asked to identify these difficulties, define strategies to solve them, discuss priorities, and assess different solutions. This presentation will focus on four difficulties: 1) numbers and units, 2) differing syntactical requirements between source and target languages, 3) terminology, and 4) and weaknesses in the original texts. Methods, principles, and solutions will be compared, discussed, and challenged from the practical perspective of as many target languages as the participants are working with.


ST-6 Warming Up to HVAC: Components, Processes, and Design Criteria
Stephanie D. Strobel
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will cover equipment, processes, and design criteria for large-scale heating, ventilation, and air conditioning applications. If time permits, a discussion of equipment for small-scale residential use will be included.


ST-7 Mind All the Gaps in Spanish>English Technical Translation
Kevin P. Costello
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Using expertise in two languages and familiarity with two cultures, translators hope to bridge linguistic and cultural gaps and thus minimize translation loss. In technical translation, however, a third gap exists. To bridge this stylistic gap, we need to apply the simple but powerful techniques of stylistic editing while translating. If we can become "bistylistic" as well as bilingual and bicultural, we will achieve both our primary aim of minimizing translation loss and the secondary aim of maximizing translation gain. Participants will learn how to do this in order to acquire added value in the competitive translation market.


ST-8 How Did Japan and China Each Emulate Front-Running Western Technology
Vincent C. Lai
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In the latter half of the 19th century, some Far Eastern countries began a race to learn from and catch up with front-running Western technology. The examples of Japan, the first one to jump in, and China, a much belated participant, provides, through various scientific and technical areas and fields, immensely interesting comparisons. Topics to be covered during the presentation will include the different language families (i.e., Indo-European, Japanese-Korean, and Sino-Tibetan) and different writing forms (i.e., phonological, logographical, and combinative).


ST-9 A Dilemma for Language Services Providers and Translators: Subject Matter Expertise and Internet Style
Manisha Mittal
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will focus on the technical translation market's evolving demands for subject matter expertise, combined with a modern writing style for new media. In addition, project managers have to balance the client's demands for quick turnaround times, competitive rates, and familiarity with computer-assisted translation tools. Specifically, we will reference three technical case studies in the areas of information technology, medicine, and farming equipment.


ST-10 Technical Writing for Into-English Translators
Karen M. Tkaczyk
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Superb writing skills are not the first thing that comes to mind when talking about a technical translator's skill set. The focus is usually on subject-matter expertise or methods for terminology research. Those are crucial, but good technical writing is a third skill that can be developed and one that improves translation quality quickly. This presentation will give practical tips for into-English technical translators. The speaker will cover topics that lead to higher quality texts that convey information effectively, precisely, clearly, and briefly. Useful resources and style guides will be considered. There will be ample opportunity for interaction.


ST-11 Science and Technology Division Annual Meeting
Karen M. Tkaczyk
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Participants will review the year's activities and discuss future plans for the division. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division. After the official business is discussed, a panel of seasoned technical translators will share their background, experiences, and the unique challenges of this sector of the language profession. Panel members include Catherine Christaki, Steven Marzuola, and Tess Whitty.


ST-12 CANCELLED
Transforming Science into Dreams: Beauty Care Rhetoric?
Agnes E. M. Meilhac
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




Science & Technology
Related Sessions

SEM-K Translating German<>English in the Renewables Sector

C-9 Translating Chinese Plant and Animal Names

G-6 Translating German<>English in the Renewables Sector: A Theoretical Overview

G-7 Translating Standard Operating Procedures

J-1 A Guide to the Scientific and Medical Fields for Japanese Translators

J-5 Current Topics in the Scientific and Medical Research Fields for Japanese Translators

J-8 Automotive/Manufacturing Interpreting

MED-1 Pharmaceutical Industry, Part I: Drug Discovery in the Laboratory

MED-2 Pharmaceutical Industry, Part II: Clinical Trials and the Regulation of New Drugs

P-8 How Green Is Your Translation? Understanding Environmental Concepts and Terminology in English and Portuguese

P-9 ANACpedia

S-6 Best Practices for Spanish Technical Writing

Translation & Interpreting Professions
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TIP-1 Hybrid Careers: Atypical Translation Skills in the Workplace
Maggey S. Oplinger
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will highlight the expanding field of hybrid translation, including niche translation, bilingual writers/editors, and cultural liaisons. In the ever-growing global market, organizations of all shapes and in all fields are realizing the importance of accuracy in communication. New work models are sprouting up and present a wonderful opportunity for translators. The presentation will culminate in a group examination of the adjusting workflow and how to maintain high translation standards in a community unfamiliar with traditional procedures.


Training and Pedagogy
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TP-1 Training Translators for an Evolving Profession: Understanding the Freelancer/Language Services Provider/Client Trio
Elizabeth Lowe McCoy, Patricia Phillips Batoma, Marian S. Greenfield, Beatriz A. Bonnet, and Joseph R. Neto
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What are the components of a first-rate translation curriculum in an age of increasing globalization and interconnectivity? This presentation will examine the complex web of relationships that constitutes the freelancer/language services provider/client trio. What do student of foreign languages aspiring to work as translators need to learn about this model in order to be successful both professionally and financially? How can translator education programs prepare future translators to use this model to their advantage and/or defend the value of their work within a system that puts them largely out of the loop?


TP-2 Tweeting to Teach: How to Mine the Internet to Train the Next Generation of Interpreters
Elena Langdon Fortier and Cristiano A. Mazzei
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Training interpreters is no longer about juggling cassette tapes and photocopying newspaper articles. Interpreter trainers in all fields need to know how to make use of available online and offline technologies to find relevant and fresh material to present to inexperienced and experienced learners. This presentation will show participants how to use web 3.0 technologies such as Twitter, YouTube, podcasts, social network sites, and other resources to train interpreters.


TP-3 Teaching Translators to Read Between the Lines: A Discussion with New York University Online Translation Faculty
Milena Savova, Eve E. Hecht, Grant Hamilton, Cristina Silva, and Pedro Cano
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Even without extensive training in law, medicine, or technology, translators can learn to think like the authors of the specialized texts they translate. Understanding why certain words or phrases have been selected and their implications for the way the texts are used, allows the translator to work more quickly and intelligently and to produce translations that echo, not only the words, but the meaning and intent of the original. A panel of New York University instructors will explain how they teach translators these essential skills.


TP-4 The Defense Language Institute's Translation and Interpreting Training Capabilities Project: Introducing Translation and Interpreting to Military Personnel
Jonathan Levy and Akmaral Mukan
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session will provide an overview of the pilot introductory translation and interpreting course designed for the Defense Language Institute. This three-week course, which includes specialized texts and simulation training based on the activities of currently deployed linguists, has been piloted in Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Farsi, French, Korean, Pashtu, and Spanish. Participants will learn how the course is designed and delivered, how various lesson types are structured, what lessons have been learned from each pilot administration, and anticipated next steps.


TP-5 Out Damned Theory!
Mark Freehill
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenter will give an overview of a five-year effort to develop theory-free pedagogical materials for training translators and interpreters, based on the practice (as opposed to the theory) of translating. The presenter's materials target English>Spanish translators, but the lessons are pretty universal. The point is you can learn translating by translating.


TP-6 Complementary Views on Sight Translation: Implications for Translator/Interpreter Training and Teaching Methodology
Gloria R. L. Sampaio
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




TP-7 Distance Education for Interpreters: Benefits, Challenges, and Perspectives
Irina Y. Jesionowski and Nestor Wagner
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Distance training for interpreters is rapidly becoming a reality in the language industry. In this presentation, faculty members of Interpreter Education Online and the Southern California School of Interpretation—distance language-pair-specific programs for court and health care interpreters—will explore benefits, challenges, and perspectives of online interpreter training. Some of the challenges are universal for any educational environment and some are unique to the interpreting profession. Topics will include curriculum and training methodology, interpreting performance evaluation criteria, and student involvement and motivation.


TP-8 Challenges and Rewards of Teaching Translation and Interpreting in Language Neutral Classrooms: A Community College Experience
Cristiano A. Mazzei
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Training translators and interpreters in language-neutral courses at the community college level offers a variety of challenges and rewards, including different levels of language proficiency, disparate levels of bilingualisms, a diversity of languages, adult learners versus undergraduate students, and distinct degrees of technology literacy. This presentation will explore the experience of a translation and interpreting program at a large college that was recently created to train and improve the quality of translation and interpreting services provided in the local community. The program focuses on issues and some solutions for situations that are specific to community college learners and students from very diverse cultural backgrounds.


Training and Pedagogy
Related Sessions

I-6 Uncharted Training Territory: Reaching Interpreters in the Field

I-13 Cognitive Theory of Simultaneous Interpreting and Training

I-14 Interpreting: A Lifelong Learning Process

J-11 Japanese Translation Programs in the U.S.

LSP-8 Localizing eLearning Projects: Strategies and Best Practices

Terminology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TRM-1 CANCELLED
Research Skills for Translators
Elizabeth H. Adams
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)




TRM-2 Search-fu! Finding Terminology on the Internet
Alex Lane
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As the Internet continues to expand, it has become an ever more important resource for up-to-date terminology, as well as an even more challenging environment in which to search for information. This presentation will focus on sharpening one's ability to find online information—a skill termed "search-fu" by Internet denizens. Techniques that combine non-obvious search engine features with novel search queries will be presented. Examples will be given of the use of these techniques to search for terminology and to clarify translations (these examples will mostly be from Russian and French into English).


TRM-3 From Chaos to Clarity: Thoughts on Migrating and Compiling a Central Termbase
Elias H. Ferguson
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Over the past year, the U.S. Department of State's Office of Language Services took on the arduous task of migrating and centralizing its termbases from Trados 2007 to Trados 2009. There were many challenges along the way, from rounding up scattered project termbases to cleaning them, preparing them for import, creating new internal and external terminology guidelines, and changing our terminology workflow. This presentation will demonstrate one process for tackling the daunting task of creating a centralized termbase. It will share the lessons that have been learned to emphasize to average computer-assisted tool users that terminology management is within their grasp.


Terminology
Related Sessions

SEM-G Terminology Management for Translators

S-10 Should I Use the Translation Memory or the Glossary?

Varia
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

V-1 Sound Science: Sanskrit's Amazing Alphabet
Terence M. Coe
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The ancient language of Sanskrit is remarkable in many ways, and is well known for its highly systematic structure. This precision extends down to the level of its alphabetical order, which is unique in its mapping of the human vocal apparatus. The science of Sanskrit phonetics, or shiksha, was developed thousands of years ago by sages who explored every aspect of vocal sound production. This presentation will demonstrate the underlying structure of the Sanskrit alphabet and rules of pronunciation. These principles can be applied to any alphabet and can help cultivate an awareness of the connections between different phonetic systems.


V-2 Linguistic Insights from Two African Languages
Bruce D. Popp
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Most ATA members work to or from Indo-European languages and are familiar with common features of grammar, word formation, and borrowing words. How does this compare with completely different languages like Kituba and Lingala, two Bantu languages from central Africa? This presentation will take a comparative look at forming plurals, verb forms (and conjugation), importing words, and the spread of the languages and social status of the speakers.


V-3 Proofreading and Copy Editing Essentials for Translators
Lorraine Alexson
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Copy editing errors can work against a translator, undermining the meaning of the original text. Designed for translators preparing English text, this presentation will cover core proofreading and copy editing skills: grammar, syntax, usage, punctuation, misplaced modifiers, dangling participles, the subjunctive, and the pluperfect. With your English language skills refreshed, you can feel more confident about translating on two levels: recognizing errors in the source text and ensuring that your translation is free of errors in English. Handouts will include practical exercises, reference materials, and contact information for post-conference queries.


V-4 The Art and Science of Diplomatic Translation
Joseph P. Mazza
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Diplomatic translators are often witnesses to history. What are the elements that make diplomatic translation a genre unto itself? What text types, subject matter, and terminology do diplomatic translators confront? What does the State Department look for when it hires translators? How has the world of diplomatic translation changed in recent years? The chief of the State Department's Translating Division will answer these and other questions and lead participants through some typical diplomatic translation assignments, including conforming treaty texts across languages. Translators of all languages are welcome.


V-5 NEW SESSION
Interpreting and Translating for Educational Organizations: Preschool to K-12
Oscar C. Carmona
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Spanish)

This presentation will focus on the various aspects of providing professional, concise, and culturally appropriate translations and interpreting services to clients in schools. Schools across the U.S. are now more diverse, and language professionals need to be prepared to convey the appropriate message. Participants will receive specific educational glossaries, links to resources, and other resources.


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